Infinity Scarf Tutorial


By Judith on September 28, 2018
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My 5 minute demo in class this month was how to make these super easy infinity scarfs.

 

DSC_0020

 

You can use anything between 1 and 4 pieces of fabric for your scarf.

 

Infinity Scarfs

 

The sumptuous softness of Art Gallery fabrics  or Liberty Lawns work particularly well, but you can also use quilting cotton, or for a more cosy scarf, try brushed cotton or snuggly fleece.

 

Would you like to know how to make them? My tutorial shows you how to make a scarf from 4 fabrics.

 

Infinity scarf tutorial

 

You will need:

Scarf made from 1 fabric: 1 x (20″ x 60″) or

Scarf made from 2 fabrics: 2 x (10.5″ x 60″) or

Scarf made from 3 fabrics: 2 x (10.5″ x 30″) & 1 x (10.5″ x 60″) or

Scarf made from 4 fabrics: 4 x (10.5″ x 30″)

3 metres mini pom pom trim (optional)

Adjustable zipper foot

 

Use 1/4″ seam allowance

 

1  Sew 2 panels right sides together  along the short edges. Press the seam open.  Repeat for the other 2 panels.

 

 

2 On the right side of one of the pairs, pin and machine tack 2 x 60″ lengths of mini pom pom trim down both long sides. The pom poms should be facing away from the outer edges.  I used my zipper foot for this part so I could sew past the pom poms.

 

 

3 Place both paired panels right sides together and sew down both long sides.  Again, I used my zipper foot here.

 

 

4 Turn the scarf right side out.

 

5  Iron under the raw edges of one short end by 1/4″.

 

 

6  Take the other short end and twist the scarf once before tucking it into the ironed under short end.

 

 

7 Even out the short ends, pin and sew them together, 1/8″ from the folded edge. You are only sewing through the 2 short ends here.

 

 

And there you have it!  A beautifully soft infinity scarf.

 

Infinity Scarfs

 

You can of course lengthen and widen the measurements here to suit your needs or style!

 

Have fun making these versatile and practical scarves. But be warned!

 

EVERYONE will want one!!!

 

Happy sewing!

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Tissue Box Cover Tutorial


By Judith on August 20, 2018
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It’s about time I posted another tutorial here, don’t you think?

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

Before all the sniffles and colds get going, how about pretty, quilted tissue box covers.  I’d much rather see pretty fabric sitting in my room, than a functional cardboard box!

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

And this tutorial will explain how to cover a box of any size, so let’s get started!

 

You Will Need:

 

Exterior Fabric

Lining Fabric

Wadding

Heavy Sew-In Vilene

Non-permanent fabric marker

Cardboard or template plastic

 

Measure your box:

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

Take measurements A (short side), B (long side) and C (top).  Then add 3/4″ (0.75″) to each measurement (1/2″ for seam allowances, 1/4″ for ease) to get the cutting out sizes.

 

You can see my measurements in the example below:

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

Cutting Out:

 

So now that you have the cutting out measurements you can either ….

 

apply all measurements to your exterior fabrics, lining fabric, wadding and heavy sew-in vilene

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

OR

 

instead of cutting out the sides, cut and baste an 11″ x 12″ piece of exterior fabric, wadding and sew-in vilene.  Once quilted, this is big enough to cut out all 4 sides.

 

 

You will also need this template for the openings.  I use the larger shape for rectangular boxes and the smaller shape for cube boxes.  Cut out the openings and transfer them to card or template plastic.

 

Make It:

 

Use 1/4″ seams

 

1  If you haven’t already done so, spray baste the exterior fabrics, wadding and vilene together.

 

2 Quilt as desired (I marked and quilted a 1.5″ diagonal grid, see photo above).

 

 

3 Pin an exterior short side (A) right sides together with the exterior top (C). With a pen, mark 1/4″ in from each corner on the short side (wrong side).

 

 

4 Sew from marker to marker, starting and finishing with a reverse stitch. Repeat for the other short side.

 

 

5 Press the short ends out before attaching the long sides in the same way (remember to mark your 1/4″ points).

 

 

6 Repeat steps 3-5 for the lining pieces.

 

 

7 Find the middle of the lining top piece (I simply folded it in half lengthways and widthways and finger pressed).

 

 

8 Centre your chosen template opening onto the wrong side of the lining top piece and draw around it.

 

 

9 Pin the exterior and lining pieces right sides together. Sew along the drawn line, starting and finishing with a reverse stitch.

 

 

10 Carefully cut out the opening, leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance. Snip at 1cm intervals all the way around the opening, taking care not to cut into the stitches.

 

 

11 Push the lining through the opening and all the way round to the back of the exterior. Iron around the opening to neaten.

 

 

12 Top stitch around the opening, 1/8″ from the edge.

 

 

13 Pin the exterior sides right sides together. Sew adjacent exterior sides together, sewing from the top down to the 1/4″ marker (fold the top piece out of the way so you can get right down to the 1/4″ marker). Start and finish with a reverse stitch.

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

14 Repeat step 13 for the lining pieces.

 

 

15 Turn the exterior right side out, by folding it out over the lining. On the inside you should be able to see the right side of the lining.

 

16 Push the lining well into the corners of the exterior cover.  Pop in the tissue box and trim off any excess cover and lining level with the edge of the box.

 

 

17 Machine tack (large stitch) around the raw edges 1/8″ from the edge.

 

 

18 Make enough double fold quilt binding to get around the bottom edges with a couple of inches overlap.  Attach, join and finish the binding as you would for a quilt.

 

Pop in the tissue box and adorn your bedside table!

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

Or how about a scrappy tissue box cover ….

 

QAYG Tissue box cover

 

…. or have some free motion sketching fun!

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

Whatever shape or design you choose for your cover, have lots of fun!

 

Happy sewing!

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Improv. Curved Placemats Tutorial


By Judith on May 4, 2018
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In keeping with our ‘curves’ theme this term, my monthly ‘5 minute lesson’ in classes this week was all about Improv. (improvisational) curves.

 

As the name suggests ‘improv.’ means you pretty much go with the flow and make up the curves as you go.  No two curves are the same, and there are much fewer rules to abide by than with standard pieced curves. You don’t even have to worry about an even seam allowance (gasp!).

 

You can imagine how well this technique went down with all my rebellious non-conformists (you know who you are!!).

 

There are many examples of improv. curves on Pinterest (see my Curves Pinterest Board here).  And to give an example of these in class, I made some improv. curved placemats, in the lovely coastal Beachcomber fabrics by Makower.

 

Improv Curves Placemat tutorial (2)

 

Here is the tutorial on how to make my Improv. Curved Placemats (makes 4 x 15 1/4″ diameter mats).

 

You will need:

Between Nine and Twelve 10″ squares (I used Beachcomber by Makower)

50cm of Wadding or Insul Bright Heat Resistant Wadding

50cm of calico

1 metre of Heat Resistant Non-Slip Table Protector (at least 35″ wide)

4.5 metres of 3/4″ wide bias binding

Co-ordinating threads

505 Basting Spray

 

Method: Assume 1/4″ seams

1 Place 2 squares of fabric on the cutting mat, right sides facing up, and overlapping.  The wider the overlap, the deeper the curves can be.  I usually overlap by 2-3″ (I am using up a smaller piece of fabric here to overlap the 10″ square).

 

 

2 Using a rotary cutter, cut a curve up through the overlapped section.

 

 

3 Remove the excess pieces (this will be the smaller piece of the right hand fabric and the smaller/underneath piece of the left hand fabric). The remaining pieces should fit neatly together.

 

 

4 Sew the 2 pieces right sides together.  It is easier to do this by straightening the underneath piece with your right hand and lifting up the top piece with your left hand.  Don’t worry if your seam allowance isn’t even the whole way down, just make sure there are no tucks.

 

 

5 Press the seam to the darkest fabric.

 

 

6 Repeat steps 2-5 for a third piece of fabric, over lapping the left hand edge of the first piece.

 

 

7 Spray baste the curved pieces, wadding and calico together (tutorial on spray basting available here).

 

 

8 Quilt the mats, starting centrally and working towards the outer edges.  I quilted in the ditches and then’echo’ quilted the curved seams 1/2″ apart.

 

 

9 Place a round plate or bowl on top and draw around it.  Cut along the line and remove the excess.  Put to one side.

 

 

10 Place the same plate/bowl onto the felted side of the non-slip table protector.  Draw around it and cut out.

 

 

11 Machine tack the table protector to the wrong side of the mat, making sure the felted side is on the inside. Machine tacking means using a large stitch on your machine, and stitching close to the edges.  If you find the rubberised table protector resisting or sticking to your sewing machine, make sure the rubberised side is facing up and engage the dual feed/walking foot on your machine.  If you don’t have these, stick some matt scotch tape to the underside of your presser foot keeping clear of the needle opening.

 

 

12 Open out the bias binding, and leaving a few inches unsewn at the start, attach the binding around the edge of the mat using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance, stopping a few inches short at the end (remember to use a quilting size stitch length here, not a tacking stitch).

 

 

13 Place the end of the bias binding over the start and measure and mark 1/2″ overlap.  Trim off the excess.

 

 

14 Open out the binding and sew the short ends together using 1/4″ seam allowance.

 

 

15 Finger press the seam open and finish sewing down the remaining binding to the mat.

16 Snip all around the edge of the mat at 1cm intervals, taking care not to cut the stitches.

 

 

17 Push the binding over to the back of the mat.  Pin in the ditch from the front, making sure the binding is caught at the back.

 

 

18 Stitch in the ditch from the front side finishing with a reverse stitch.

 

 

And you’re finished!

Improv Curves Placemats

 

Adorn your table with your beautiful mats and wait for the compliments!

 

Improv Curves Placemats

 

So why not have a go at this organic and fun technique!

 

I hope you enjoy your venture into improv. curves!

 

Happy curving!

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Tutorial: Quilted Plant Pot Cover


By Judith on April 10, 2018
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As promised, here is my tutorial for these uber cute Plant Pot Covers (fits an Ikea small plant pot).

 

Quilted Plant Pot Cover

 

Measurements listed are width x height

Assume 1/4″ seams

Finished Size: 4.5″ (w) x 5″ (h) x 4″ (d)

 

Quilted Plant Pot Cover

 

You will need:

Exterior: 2 x (9″ x 8.5″)

Lining: 2 x (9″ x 8.5″)

Sew-in Flex Foam (Bosal): 2 x (9″x 8.5″)

505 Basting Spray

20″ length of lace or trim

 

Make the Exterior:

1 Spray baste the exterior pieces to the flex foam pieces & quilt as desired.

 

 

2 Measure and cut out 2″ squares from the bottom corners of both exterior pieces.

 

 

3 Pin both exterior pieces right sides together. Sew both sides and bottom edges, using a reverse stitch to start and finish (leave the corners unsewn).

 

 

4 Put your hand inside the basket and push the base down flat. Then push the side seam down on top of the base seam – this brings the raw edges of the corners together. Pin.

 

 

5 Sew along the corners, using a reverse stitch to start and finish. Turn right side out.  Put to one side.

 

 

Make the Lining:

6 Repeat steps 1 – 5 for the lining, leaving a 2″ gap in a side seam for turning (do not turn right side out).

 

 

Assemble the Basket:

7 Place the exterior basket inside the lining, right sides will be together. Align & pin the side seams and top edges.

 

 

 

8 Sew around the top edge (removing the accessory tray from your machine will help here).  Start and finish with a reverse stitch.

 

 

9 Turn the basket right sides out through the gap in the lining.  Push the corners well out and hand or machine stitch the gap closed.

 

10 Push the lining into the basket and pin around the top edge, making sure the lining isn’t sitting proud above the exterior.

 

 

11 Sew around the top edge, starting and finishing with a reverse stitch.

 

12 Pin and sew the lace around the top edge, pointing upwards, and overlap the start and finish by 1/2″.

 

 

13 Fold the top of the basket out and pop in your potted plant!

 

Line ’em up and wait for the compliments!!

 

Quilted Plant Pot Cover

Happy sewing!

 

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Disappearing Blocks!


By Judith on March 11, 2018
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In my classes last week, I gave another ‘5 minute demo’.  This month the demo was all about Disappearing Blocks!

 

No, not magic tricks or a trick of the eye.  But how to turn a well known quilt block into something rather special (without lots of intricate piecing)!

The following are pictorial instructions on how to make the disappearing blocks.  A few notes to consider before we get started:

 

    • please work on the basis of colour placement being the same in each series, even if the fabrics are slightly different! (A big thank you to my daughter for making all the blocks)
    • I haven’t included sizes here.  You need to start with the finished block size and work backwards allowing for extra seam allowances per cut.
    • The position of the ‘cut’ lines can vary to give different effects, as long as they are equidistant from each seam.
    • check out my pinterest board for tutorials, sizes and variations.

 

1. Disappearing 9 Patch:

 

 

Here’s what to do:

 

2. Disappearing 9 Patch Variation:

 

 

Here’s what to do:

 

3.  Double Disappearing 9 Patch:

 

 

Here’s what to do:

 

4. Disappearing Hourglass:

 

 

Here’s what to do:

 

 

 

5. Disappearing Pinwheel:

 

 

Here’s what to do:

 

 

6. Disappearing Pinwheel Variation:

 

 

Here’s what to do:

 

 

7. Disappearing Four Patch:

(assume finished block is in same fabrics!)

 

 

Here’s what to do:

 

 

 

8. Disappearing 4 Patch Variation:

Start with another 4 patch block.

 

 

 

These are just a sample of the many disappearing blocks you can make! Aren’t they cool!

 

photo courtesy of British Patchwork & Quilting magazine

 

And if you make a quilt with one of these disappearing blocks, you can get some lovely secondary patterns emerging too, like my Disappearing 9 Patch quillow (pattern available here.)

 

I hope you have been inspired and have fun making some impressive (yet easy) quilt blocks!

 

Happy sewing!

 

 

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Travel Sewing Pouch Tutorial


By Judith on January 20, 2018
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Happy weekend everyone!

 

I hope you’ve had a good week.

 

How would you fancy another Just Jude Designs tutorial!  It’s been a while so I thought it was time to share one of my handy pouch patterns!

 

 

If you attend regular sewing classes, a Quilting Guild or charity sewing groups, you will know there’s a lot of stuff to remember to bring with you each time!

 

7.5” x 17.5” (19cm x 44.5cm) opened;  7.5” x 9” (19cm x 23cm) closed

 

So a travel sewing pouch might be just the thing you need to keep your essentials compact and portable.

 

 

And there’s a handy little zippered pocket in the back!

 

So before we get started, here are a few essential points:

 

  • Use quarter inch seams throughout
  • Avoid directional prints for the main/outer fabric (it will be upside down when the flap folds over – ask me how I know!!)
  • All cutting instructions are shown width x height

 

Right, let’s go!

 

Materials/Cutting:

For main/outer/flap cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 17”/43cm)

For front/small pocket cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 10”/25.5cm)

For lining cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 17”/43cm)

For medium pocket cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 13”/33cm)

For large pocket cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 16”/40.5cm)

For zippered pocket lining cut:  2 x (8”/20cm x 9”/23cm)

From sew-in vilene cut:   1 x (8”/20cm x 17”/43cm)

You will also need:

Elastic hair bobble

Button

Basting Spray (505)

5” plastic zipper

Zipper foot

Non-permanent marking pen/tool

 

Method:

1 Spray baste the vilene to the wrong side of the main/outer fabric.

 

2 Iron all 3 pockets in half widthways, wrong sides together. Top stitch along top/folded edges.

 

 

 

3 Place the small and medium pockets together (aligned at the bottom & side edges). Chalk & sew lines onto the small pocket to create dividers as required. Use a reverse stitch at the top/folded edge. Do not sew a central line through all layers as this will be sewn in the next step.

 

 

4 Place the small and medium pockets on top of the large pocket, again aligning bottom and side edges. Mark a line that runs vertically through the middle of the small and medium pockets only. Sew on this line, through all layers, again using a reverse stitch at the top edge.

 

 

5 Place the pocket section on top of the lining (right side facing) aligning the bottom and side edges. Machine tack together. Put to one side.

 

 

 

6 Make the back/zippered pocket: Hand or machine stitch the open end of the zipper closed to hold in place.

 

 

7 Place one of the zippered pocket linings right sides together with the outer fabric, aligning the bottom and side edges.

Draw a line on the pocket fabric, 2” (5cm) down from the top and 1.5” (4cm) in from each side.

 

 

8 Next draw a line ¼” (6mm) above and below the first line. Join up the sides and draw > shapes ¼” (6mm) in from each side.

 

 

9 Pin the layers together and sew on the outer lines only through both layers. Do not sew on the centre line.

 

 

10 Carefully cut along the centre line and > lines into the corners. You need to cut right into the corners without snipping the stitches.  A small pair of embroidery stitches are useful here.

 

 

11 Push the pocket fabric through the letterbox opening to the back. Press well so no pocket fabric is seen.

 

 

12 Place the zipper into the letterbox opening, so that the ‘teeth’ are showing on the right side. Pin and carefully sew around the opening using 1/8” (3mm) seam allowance.

 

 

13 Pin the remaining pocket lining piece right sides together with the first pocket lining piece. Do not pin through to the main/outer fabric.

 

 

14 Clip or pin the outer fabric back out of the way before sewing around all sides of the pocket linings.

 

 

15 Complete the pouch: Machine or hand tack an elastic hair bobble to the top edge of the outer fabric, centred and with the main loop pointing down.

 

 

16 Place the outer piece right sides together with the lining/pockets. Pin and sew around all edges, leaving a 3” (8cm) gap in the top of one of the sides. Carefully snip the corners at an angle to remove the bulk.

 

 

 

17 Turn the pouch right sides out, push the corners well out and press well.

18 Hand stitch the gap closed and sew on a button 2” (5cm) up from the bottom edge and centred.

 

 

Fill with all your sewing essentials!

 

 

Happy sewing!

 

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Selvedge Bookmark Tutorial


By Judith on September 17, 2017
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Hello everyone!

 

How are you doing?

 

I haven’t done a tutorial here in a long while, so I thought it was time to rectify that.

 

 

You know how I’m always saving fabric scraps? Well I even keep the part of the fabric most people chuck away!

 

If like me you love to read, or know an avid reader, how about a selvedge bookmark? The perfect fabric/book loving combo!!

 

The key to keeping usable selvedges is to allow at least a quarter of an inch of fabric above the text (the edge below the text is a sealed edge, not a raw edge).

 

 

Here’s the tutorial:

 

Materials:

 

A selection of selvedges (with at least 6mm/0.25” above the text)

4” x 10” piece of heavy sew-in vilene (or wadding)

4” x 10” piece of cotton fabric (back)

1 x 10mm eyelet

12” length of narrow ribbon

 

Method:

Assume ¼” seam allowance unless advised otherwise

 

  1. Angle the top corners of the vilene/wadding by measuring 1” from each corner along the top edge and 2” down from each corner along the sides

 

 

2. Place your first selvedge level with the bottom edge of the vilene/wadding (remember ¼” will be absorbed by the seam allowance).

 

 

3. Place the next selvedge on top, with the sealed edge covering the raw edge of the first selvedge. Stitch close to the sealed edge.

 

 

4. Continue adding selvedges in this way until all of the vilene/wadding is covered.

 

 

5. Flip the bookmark over to reveal the original shape of the vilene/wadding. Trim away the excess selvedges.

 

 

6. Place the backing fabric right sides together with the bookmark and sew around all sides, leaving a 2” gap in the middle of the bottom edge. Trim away the corners.

 

 

7.  Turn the bookmark right sides out through the gap in the lining. Push the corners well out and press.  Press under the raw edges of the gap.

 

8. Top stitch 1/8” from the edges on all sides, closing the gap as you go.

 

 

9. Insert an eyelet at the top of the bookmark, using the manufacturer’s instructions.

 

 

10. Thread the ribbon through the eyelet and knot to secure.

 

And you’re done!

 

 

Time to curl up in a squishy sofa, with a snuggly quilt and hot chocolate, and allow a good book to take you and your imagination to far flung places!

 

Happy selvedging!

 

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Easter Bunny Bags Tutorial


By Judith on March 29, 2017
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Hello and welcome to Just Jude Designs, especially if you are here as one of the 2017 Finish-a-long participants.

 

As one of the new hosts this year, it’s is my privilege to share with you a tutorial to keep you inspired during our first Tutorial Week!

 

With Easter not too far away, I thought you might like a quick make that oozes cuteness and gives you nifty way to gift to your ‘chocolate loving’ friends and family!

 

 

Finishing at 4″ wide by 7″ tall (incl. ears!), they are the perfect size for filling with small chocolates and eggs!

 

Here’s how to make them:

You will need:

Outer Fabric: 2 x (6″ wide by 8″ tall)
Lining Fabric: 2 x (6″ wide by 8″ tall)
Ears front: 2 x (2.5″ wide by 4.5″ tall)
Ears back: 2 x (2.5″ wide by 4.5″ tall)
Lightweight iron-on vilene: 1 x (2.5″ x 9″)
0.5″ wide ribbon: 2 x 17″
small safety pin

 

Assume 1/4″ seams

Download ‘Ear’ template here.

 

1. Iron the vilene onto the wrong sides of 2 matching ear fabrics. Cut the 2 pieces apart. Using the ears template, draw an ‘ear’ onto the wrong sides of the other ear fabrics.

 

2. Place (different) ear fabrics right sides together and sew on pencil line (use a reverse stitch to start and finish). Trim away excess fabric, leaving 1/8″ seam allowance.

 

3. Turn the ears right sides out, press and turn under the open ends. Sew across the ends as close to the edges as you can.  Put to one side.

 

4. Place the outer fabrics right sides together.  Mark 2″ down from both top corners.

 

5. Sew around sides and bottom from marker to marker.  Repeat for the 2 lining pieces, but leave a 2″ gap in the bottom edge.

 

6. Pull the corners apart and place the side seam on top of the bottom seam. Measure 1″ along the seam from the point (this will give you 2″ vertically).  Mark the vertical line and sew along this line. Repeat for both corners on outer bag and lining.

 

7. Place the top ‘flaps’ right sides together, outer fabric with lining. Pin at the point where the side seams meet.

 

8. Sew around both ‘flaps’ between pins at both sides. Use a reverse stitch to start and finish, and take care not to sew into the existing seam.

 

9. Turn bag right side out through the gap in the lining. Hand or machine stitch the gap closed and press well.

 

10. Press the flaps under by approx. 0.5″ or until they reach the side seams. Pin and sew one flap down (as close to the edge as possible).  Use a reverse stitch to start and finish.

 

11. Pin the ears onto the remaining (turned under) flap leaving approx. 1″ between the ears at the bottom. Sew along the edge of the flap and along the bottom of the ears. Use a reverse stitch to start and finish.

 

12. Attach the safety pin to one end of the ribbon and pass through both channels until it comes out the same side where you started.

 

13. Knot the ribbon ends together and repeat for the other piece of ribbon from the opposite side.

 

And you’re finished!
Fill up the bag with chocolate goodies and pull the drawstrings to close!
(I guarantee you it won’t stay closed for long!!)
And for more fantastic tutorials this week, check out this list:

 

Don’t forget to link up your Q1 finishes here, before 1st April.

 

Happy (Easter) sewing!

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Easter Bibs Tutorial


By Judith on March 10, 2016
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Welcome back to the second tutorial in my mini Easter series, and thank you to everyone for your lovely comments and responses to my Bunny Bags tutorial.

Today’s tutorial is for the youngest members of the chocolate fan club Family!

Baby Bibs Tutorial
Approx. 7.5″ by 11″ tall (buttoned)

These cute Easter bibs are so simple to make, using some cotton and towelling! In fact, 1 hand towel yields 5 bibs!

Baby Bibs Tutorial

 


Here’s what you need:

Materials:

Cotton (at least 8.5″ wide by 14″ tall per bib) good quality to withstand lots of washing!
1 white hand towel
1 set of snap fasteners

Method:  Assume 1/4″ seams

Download the bib template here.

1. Using the bib template, cut out 1 from the cotton and 1 from the towel.

2. Place right sides together and sew around all sides, leaving a 2″ gap in the bottom edge.

3. Carefully snip into all the curves at 1cm intervals. Turn bib right sides out through the gap. Press well and turn under the raw edges of the gap.

4. From the top side, sew around the bib 1/8″ from the edge closing the gap as you go.

5. Attach snap fasteners according to the manufacturers instructions. I found these KAM fasteners really easy to use (for similar snaps and pliers see here).

And you’re done!  Attach to baby (sorry, I don’t have one of those!) and feed!

And if you have a real dribble bucket teething baby on your hands, check out this tutorial for making cute dribble bandanas.

Baby Bibs Tutorial


Have fun!

(I’ll have more on my patchwork bibs tomorrow!)

Jude xo

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Bunny Bags (Part 2) Tutorial


By Judith on March 7, 2016
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Happy Monday everyone!

With less than 3 weeks until Easter Day, I think it’s time we got started on some fun tutorials, don’t you!

And to kick us off, how about some cute drawstring Bunny Bags!

Easter Bunny Bags tutorial

How cute are these!  The perfect size for filling with small chocolates and eggs!

Bunny Bags!

Approx. 4″ wide by 7″ tall (incl. ears!)

You will need:

Outer Bag: 2 x (6″ wide by 8″ tall)
Lining: 2 x (6″ wide by 8″ tall)
Ears front: 2 x (2.5″ wide by 4.5″ tall)
Ears back: 2 x (2.5″ wide by 4.5″ tall)
Lightweight iron-on vilene: 1 x (2.5″ x 9″)
0.5″ wide ribbon: 2 x 17″
small safety pin

Assume 1/4″ seams

Download ‘Ear’ template here.

1. Iron the vilene onto the wrong sides of 2 matching ear fabrics. Cut the 2 pieces apart. Using the ears template, draw an ‘ear’ onto the wrong sides of the other ear fabrics.

2. Place (different) ear fabrics right sides together and sew on pencil line (use a reverse stitch to start and finish). Trim away excess fabric, leaving 1/8″ seam allowance.

3. Turn the ears right sides out, press and turn under the open ends. Sew across the ends as close to the edges as you can.  Put to one side.

4. Place the outer fabrics right sides together.  Mark 2″ down from both top corners.

5. Sew around sides and bottom from marker to marker.  Repeat for the 2 lining pieces, but leave a 2″ gap in the bottom edge.

6. Pull the corners apart and place the side seam on top of the bottom seam. Measure 1″ along the seam from the point (this will give you 2″ vertically).  Mark the vertical line and sew along this line. Repeat for both corners on outer bag and lining.

7. Place the top ‘flaps’ right sides together, outer fabric with lining. Pin at the point where the side seams meet.

8. Sew around both ‘flaps’ between pins at both sides. Use a reverse stitch to start and finish, and take care not to sew into the existing seam.

9. Turn bag right side out through the gap in the lining. Hand or machine stitch the gap closed and press well.

10. Press the flaps under by approx. 0.5″ or until they reach the side seams. Pin and sew one flap down (as clos
e to the edge as possible).  Use a reverse stitch to start and finish.

11. Pin the ears onto the remaining (turned under) flap leaving approx. 1″ between the ears at the bottom. Sew along the edge of the flap and along the bottom of the ears. Use a reverse stitch to start and finish.

12. Attach the safety pin to one end of the ribbon and pass through both channels until it comes out the same side where you started.

13. Knot the ribbon ends together and repeat for the other piece of ribbon from the opposite side.

And you’re finished!
Fill up the bag with chocolate goodies and pull the drawstrings to close!
(I guarantee you it won’t stay closed for long!!)
Tune in again for more tutorials on everything you see here in my Easter basket!
Easter Tutorials on my blog

Happy Easter Sewing!
Jude xo

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