Ebb and Flow Quilt


By Judith on June 21, 2017
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Happy Wednesday everyone!

 

The gorgeous weather continues here!  Such a treat!

 

When I make a quilt I always photograph it before I send it off to the magazine.   However, doing commission work at least one season ahead means the weather and season at time of photographing doesn’t match the theme of the quilt!

 

Ebb & Flow quilt (Popular Patchwork July17)
Finished quilt 64″ x 76″

 

Take for example my Ebb and Flow quilt!  This is the photograph I took of it on completion in April.  Drab and dreary right?

 

 

And ironic too because the fabrics used in this quilt are called ‘Blue Sky’ by Laundry Basket Quilts (background is Linen Texture, both by Makower). Oh how I wish there were blue skies when I photographed this quilt!

 

Ebb & Flow Quilt (Popular Patchwork July17)

 

I went for simple mitred piecing in columns to give a contemporary twist to these classic prints.

 

Ebb & Flow quilt (Popular Patchwork July17)

 

I knew there had to be organic wavy quilting vertically through the columns to enhance the ‘ebb and flow’ movement in the quilt. Aurifil 50wt is my ‘go to’ thread for quilting.

 

Ebb & Flow quilt (Popular Patchwork July17)

 

So there you have my blue sky Ebb and Flow summer quilt, fulfilling the Editor’s brief of soft summer blues with an organic design. The pattern is in the July issue of Popular Patchwork, out now.

 

May the wonderful weather continue!

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Oriental Clamshells Quilt


By Judith on January 6, 2018
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Hello there!

 

How is your weekend going?

 

I spent a lovely afternoon sewing today, with my fellow Bee Blessed buddies.  The room was a hive of activity as we kicked off the new year getting more quilts ready to gift to those in need of comfort.

 

Oriental Clamshells Quilt (Popular Patchwork Jan18)

 

A few months back I made a quilt for Popular Patchwork. They sent me a lovely collection of fabrics called Japanese Garden by Makower.

 

Oriental Clamshell Quilt (Popular Patchwork Quilt)

 

When I first saw the fabrics I was a little unsure what to do with them.  There are many motifs and shapes in the fabrics to draw from, flowers, butterflies, dragonflies.

 

Oriental Clamshell Quilt (Popular Patchwork Jan18)

 

But I have a bit of a thing about curves (!!) and just had to scratch that itch!

 

As a patchwork and quilting tutor I often come across a fearful response to the mention of curved piecing!

 

Oriental Clamshell Quilt (Popular Patchwork Quilt)

 

But the bigger the curves, the easier the piecing!

 

So if you haven’t tried making a drunkard’s path block before, these large scale ones are a great place to start.  I use a ‘no pin’ method, which means you get quickly into a repetitive rhythm piecing the curves.

 

Oriental Clamshell Quilt (Popular Patchwork Quilt)

 

This quilt is currently in the January issue of Popular Patchwork …..

 

Oriental Clamshell Quilt (Popular Patchwork Quilt)
Photo courtesy of Popular Patchwork

 

…. and it is also hanging up in my new classroom.

 

 

So my new students had better beware!  I’m hatching a plan that involves ‘curves’! After all, real women have curves!

 

Keep sewing!

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Handmade Spools Quilt & Classes Update


By Judith on January 17, 2018
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Hi there!

 

Are you still surrounded by snow?

 

Even a little of the white stuff causes so much disruption here! Someone in particular is reluctant to venture out in it!

 

Paw prints in the snow!

 

Thankfully most folks were still able to get to my classes.  We are into our 2nd week of the first 6 week block.

 

New Classes Jan18

 

 

And I’m happy to report that feedback about the new spacious and light-flooded classroom, stunning view and historical surroundings has been immensely positive.

 

I will soon be releasing information and dates about my Saturday workshops, starting in March.  Watch this space!

 

(You can find more information about the classes here.)

 

So onto a beginner friendly quilt I designed for British Patchwork & Quilting magazine (January issue).

 

Handmade Spools Quilt (British Patchwork & Quilting Jan18)
Photo courtesy of British Patchwork & Quilting

 

This is ‘Handmade Spools’, made using Makower’s sewing themed ‘Handmade’ fabrics (view all the fabrics here).

 

Handmade Spools Quilt (British Patchwork & Quilting Jan18)

 

The spool shapes are made using half square triangles, no tricky ‘Y’ seams here!  And the centre of each spool headlines the cute prints of pins, threads, buttons, scissors and notions.

 

Handmade Spools Quilt (British Patchwork & Quilting Jan18)

 

So if you want to dip your toe into patchwork and quilting without feeling overwhelmed, why not try your hand at Handmade!

 

Handmade Spools Quilt (British Patchwork & Quilting Jan18)

 

Happy sewing!

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Katie Jane Quilt


By Judith on March 6, 2018
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Hello everyone!

 

Well I’m so glad the snow has gone from Belfast! I had to cancel 2 classes last week because of it!  It’s s(n)oooooooo(w) disrupting!

 

Classes were back to normal yesterday, and I’ve been enjoying showing my ladies a little ‘magic trick’ in this month’s 5 Minute Demo (more on that at the end of the week!).

 

What I can show you, is one of my quilts which is currently featured in the March issue of Pretty Patches magazine.

 

Katie Jane Quilt (Pretty Patches March18)
64″ x 64″

This is Kate Jane, named after the Makower fabric collection of the same name!

 

Katie Jane Quilt (Pretty Patches March18)

 

I love any ditsy, flowery prints, so I was in heaven working with these lovelies!  Wouldn’t some of these prints make the prettiest summer dresses!

 

Katie Jane Quilt (Pretty Patches March18)

 

You could loosely describe this quilt as a medallion quilt, or a giant one block quilt (with a border!).

 

Easy piecing and large scale half square triangles mean this quilt can be assembled quickly and without too much fuss.

 

Katie Jane Quilt (Pretty Patches March18)

 

And I’m happy to report the leftovers are being worked into my next class project (all in good time!).

 

Katie Jane Quilt (Pretty Patches March18)

 

So if you’re looking for a girly, slightly vintagey themed quilt, you should definitely consider Katie Jane!

 

Katie Jane Quilt (Pretty Patches March18)

 

 

Happy sewing!

 

 

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Improv. Curved Placemats Tutorial


By Judith on May 4, 2018
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In keeping with our ‘curves’ theme this term, my monthly ‘5 minute lesson’ in classes this week was all about Improv. (improvisational) curves.

 

As the name suggests ‘improv.’ means you pretty much go with the flow and make up the curves as you go.  No two curves are the same, and there are much fewer rules to abide by than with standard pieced curves. You don’t even have to worry about an even seam allowance (gasp!).

 

You can imagine how well this technique went down with all my rebellious non-conformists (you know who you are!!).

 

There are many examples of improv. curves on Pinterest (see my Curves Pinterest Board here).  And to give an example of these in class, I made some improv. curved placemats, in the lovely coastal Beachcomber fabrics by Makower.

 

Improv Curves Placemat tutorial (2)

 

Here is the tutorial on how to make my Improv. Curved Placemats (makes 4 x 15 1/4″ diameter mats).

 

You will need:

Between Nine and Twelve 10″ squares (I used Beachcomber by Makower)

50cm of Wadding or Insul Bright Heat Resistant Wadding

50cm of calico

1 metre of Heat Resistant Non-Slip Table Protector (at least 35″ wide)

4.5 metres of 3/4″ wide bias binding

Co-ordinating threads

505 Basting Spray

 

Method: Assume 1/4″ seams

1 Place 2 squares of fabric on the cutting mat, right sides facing up, and overlapping.  The wider the overlap, the deeper the curves can be.  I usually overlap by 2-3″ (I am using up a smaller piece of fabric here to overlap the 10″ square).

 

 

2 Using a rotary cutter, cut a curve up through the overlapped section.

 

 

3 Remove the excess pieces (this will be the smaller piece of the right hand fabric and the smaller/underneath piece of the left hand fabric). The remaining pieces should fit neatly together.

 

 

4 Sew the 2 pieces right sides together.  It is easier to do this by straightening the underneath piece with your right hand and lifting up the top piece with your left hand.  Don’t worry if your seam allowance isn’t even the whole way down, just make sure there are no tucks.

 

 

5 Press the seam to the darkest fabric.

 

 

6 Repeat steps 2-5 for a third piece of fabric, over lapping the left hand edge of the first piece.

 

 

7 Spray baste the curved pieces, wadding and calico together (tutorial on spray basting available here).

 

 

8 Quilt the mats, starting centrally and working towards the outer edges.  I quilted in the ditches and then’echo’ quilted the curved seams 1/2″ apart.

 

 

9 Place a round plate or bowl on top and draw around it.  Cut along the line and remove the excess.  Put to one side.

 

 

10 Place the same plate/bowl onto the felted side of the non-slip table protector.  Draw around it and cut out.

 

 

11 Machine tack the table protector to the wrong side of the mat, making sure the felted side is on the inside. Machine tacking means using a large stitch on your machine, and stitching close to the edges.  If you find the rubberised table protector resisting or sticking to your sewing machine, make sure the rubberised side is facing up and engage the dual feed/walking foot on your machine.  If you don’t have these, stick some matt scotch tape to the underside of your presser foot keeping clear of the needle opening.

 

 

12 Open out the bias binding, and leaving a few inches unsewn at the start, attach the binding around the edge of the mat using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance, stopping a few inches short at the end (remember to use a quilting size stitch length here, not a tacking stitch).

 

 

13 Place the end of the bias binding over the start and measure and mark 1/2″ overlap.  Trim off the excess.

 

 

14 Open out the binding and sew the short ends together using 1/4″ seam allowance.

 

 

15 Finger press the seam open and finish sewing down the remaining binding to the mat.

16 Snip all around the edge of the mat at 1cm intervals, taking care not to cut the stitches.

 

 

17 Push the binding over to the back of the mat.  Pin in the ditch from the front, making sure the binding is caught at the back.

 

 

18 Stitch in the ditch from the front side finishing with a reverse stitch.

 

 

And you’re finished!

Improv Curves Placemats

 

Adorn your table with your beautiful mats and wait for the compliments!

 

Improv Curves Placemats

 

So why not have a go at this organic and fun technique!

 

I hope you enjoy your venture into improv. curves!

 

Happy curving!

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