Log Cabin Family of Blocks: Part 4


By Judith on May 27, 2019
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Welcome to the final part of my Log Cabin Family of Blocks series.

Part 1 (Log Cabin) available here

Part 2 (Courthouse Steps) available here

Part 3 (Pineapple) available here

(All sample blocks were made using Handmade fabrics by Makower)

 

Now in my introduction to this series, I described this part as the Mystery section!

That’s because this post is all about Partial Seams!

 

Partial Seams Variations

 

Just like the other Log Cabin Family members, in these examples fabric is pieced around a central shape.

 

1 Log Cabin

 

You may have noticed that the ‘logs’ in the Log Cabin block above are equal length in each round, unlike the Log Cabin Block from Part 1.

 

Partial Seams
Log Cabin Block: Part 4

Log Cabin Construction
Log Cabin Block: Part 1

 

This is made possible by starting each round with a partial seam (denoted here with the number 0.5 instead of 1!).

 

Partial Seams Construction

 

The first ‘log’ being attached is stitched only half way along the seam.  It is then pressed out allowing the 2nd ‘log’ to be fully attached.  This one is then pressed out before attaching log 3 and the same for log 4.  Now you can bring the unsewn section of log 1 right sides together to log 4 and finish sewing the starting (partial) seam.

 

Photo source: Pieced By Number

 

I love how clever this technique is.  Without prior knowledge of partial seams, it would be difficult to work out how to construct this block.  Therein lies the mystery!!

 

2. Rail Fence

In this example, the ‘rail fence’ sections are pieced separately, before being attached to the centre square.

 

Partial Seams

 

As before, the first seam will be a partial seam.

 

Partial Seams

 

(Tutorial for a similar block available here)

 

3. Hope of Hartford

 

As for the Rail Fence block above, the corner sections of this block are made separately, before being pieced around the centre square.

 

Partial Seams

 

(Tutorial available here)

 

4 Octagon

 

And just like a traditional Log Cabin block, you don’t have to start with a square!

The ‘logs’ in each round of this Octagon block start with a partial seam, just like the partial seams version of the Log Cabin block .

 

Partial Seams

 

Here is an example of a quilt I made using partial seams in the blocks:

 

Crossed Paths Quilt (Quilt Now Jan18)
Crossed Paths for Quilt Now Magazine

 

And to make the partial seams blocks a little easier to spot, here is a deconstructed block from the quilt:

 

 

Now that you know how easy partial seams are, I hope you won’t be put off trying a whole other range of blocks to enhance your quilts.

 

And check out my Pinterest Board for lots more fabulous examples of Partial Seams!

 

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Thank you for tuning in to my Log Cabin Family of Blocks series.

 

I hope you have enjoyed it as much as I have!

 

Happy sewing!

 

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Log Cabin Family of Blocks: Part 3


By Judith on May 24, 2019
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Welcome to part 3 of my series on Log Cabin blocks (part 1 available here; part 2 available here).

 

 

So far we’ve looked at the variations within Log Cabin and Courthouse Steps blocks.

 

This post is all about the Pineapple Block.

 

Pineapple Block

 

Like me, you may be surprised that the Pineapple block is included in the Log Cabin family of blocks.

 

But there are definite similarities.  Fabric strips of equal width are added in rounds from the centre square outwards (just like Log Cabin or Courthouse Steps).

 

Pineapple Block construction

 

The main difference this time is each round is trimmed ‘on point’ to create a diamond shape, before the next round is added. By alternating the background and main fabrics each round, pineapple shapes start to emerge.

 

Photo Source: Pinterest

 

There are several ways to create the Pineapple Block:

 

1 Foundation Pieced:

 

For my block (above) I printed and enlarged a paper template and sewed directly onto the paper, only removing the paper on completion of the block.

 

While this is a time consuming method (especially for a full quilt!) it results in precision piecing and accurate points and edges.

 

(Tutorial and template available here)

 

2 No Foundation Papers:

 

Photo source: Crazy Mom Quilts

 

You don’t have to use foundation paper to make a Pineapple Block.  Click here for a great tutorial on the ‘trim as you go’ method by Crazy Mom Quilts.

 

3 Creative Grids Ruler

 

 

The clever peeps at Creative Grids have made the lives of Pineapple Block makers much easier with this fab trimming tool!

 

It looks complicated to use, but Jenny Doan makes light work of it in her video tutorial here.

 

Photo source: Missouri Star Quilt Co.

 

I love how cavalier the piecing can be with this method, and still end up with a beautifully accurate block!

 

This will definitely be my ‘go to’ method when I get around to making a Pineapple Quilt!

 

Photo source: The Work Room

 

I particularly love this pillow example of the Pineapple Block by The Work Room.

 

And you can see lots more wonderful Pineapple blocks and quilts to drool over on my Pinterest board here.

 

Thank you for tuning in!

 

Come back soon for my final (Mystery) part of the Log Cabin Family of Blocks.

 

Happy sewing!

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Log Cabin Family of Blocks: Part 2


By Judith on May 21, 2019
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Welcome back to my Log Cabin Blocks series (part 1 available here).

Log Cabin Family of Blocks

 

In part 1 we looked at a range of Log Cabin blocks, from Traditional to Wonky!

 

In part 2, we are going to look at the 2nd category in this family of blocks.

(All sample blocks are made using fabrics from ‘Handmade’ by Makower)

 

Part 2: Courthouse Steps

 

Courthouse Steps Variations

 

1.  Traditional:

Similar to the traditional Log Cabin Block, ‘steps’ are added in rounds to the centre square, this time attaching to two opposite edges first before adding steps to the remaining 2 edges.  The ‘steps’ are the same width.

 

Courthouse Steps Construction

 

Here is one of my traditional Courthouse Steps Quilts, this time starting with a background square (I’ve marked the block to make it easier for you to identify).

 

 

‘Garden Steps’ featured in British Patchwork & Quilting Magazine

 

I love how the secondary pattern from the Courthouse Steps blocks dominates in this design!

You can find a traditional Courthouse Steps block tutorial here.

 

2. Colour Rounds:

As with the Log Cabin Colour Rounds variation, the same fabric is used in each round, but sticking with the same traditional Courthouse Steps construction.

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

3. Cornerstones:

By adding squares (cornerstones) to the ends of the ‘steps’ you will add an Irish Chain secondary pattern to your quilt.

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

Photo source: http://serial-quilter.blogspot.com

 

4. Rectangle

You can change the starting shape of a Courthouse Steps Block to any 4 sided shape (like Log Cabin) but not a triangle.

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

As I mentioned in my last post, there are lots more great Courthouse steps variations available.  Like this ‘sliced’ Courthouse Steps:

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

In this version, you make two blocks in two fabrics, one positive, one negative.

 

Slice them in half diagonally, switch them over and sew back together!

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

Now the point of doing this lies in the secondary patterns you can achieve from Sliced Courthouse Steps.

 

Photo source https://mypatchwork.wordpress.com

 

Aren’t they cool!

A video tutorial of Sliced Courthouse Steps is available here.

 

You can find more inspiring Courthouse Steps examples on my Pinterest board here.

 

And I’ll leave you with a picture of a Courthouse Steps block I’m currently working on, using vintage sheets.

 

 

I hope you’ll come back soon for part 3 of our Log Cabin Family series.

 

Happy sewing!

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Log Cabin Family of Blocks: Part 1


By Judith on May 20, 2019
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Last week in classes I taught a short lesson on the Log Cabin Family of blocks!

 

Log Cabin Family of Blocks

 

I’m going to take you through the 3 main categories in a series of posts, with a mystery post to finish the series!

 

Part 1: Log Cabin

Part 2: Courthouse Steps

Part 3: Pineapple

Part 4: Watch this space!

 

I demonstrated a few variations within each category, but there are many more than what I can show you here (follow the Pinterest links for lots more inspiration!).

 

(All the sample blocks have been made using Handmade by Makower)

 

Part 1: Log Cabin

 

Log Cabin Variations

 

1 Traditional:

The standard log cabin block starts with a square centre (traditionally this would have been red) adding ‘logs’ around the centre square (either clockwise or anti-clockwise) in rounds.  All the logs are the same width.

Log Cabin Construction

The traditional log cabin block was the first block I learned, and made a little quilt for my young daughter using chopped up clothes and linens!

 

Shannon's Log Cabin Quilt

 

You can find a tutorial on how to make a 12″ traditional block here.

 

2 Colour Rounds:

 

This variation of Log Cabin follows exactly the same construction as the traditional version, but keeping the fabric choice of each round the same.

 

Log Cabin Colour Rounds

 

Just a change of fabric placement dramatically changes the look of this block.  Here’s another similar example, the back of quilt I made several years ago.

 

Brit Bee Log Cabin Quilt (Back)

 

3 Wonky:

 

If you enjoy a little ‘improv’ piecing then how about a Wonky Log Cabin!

 

Wonky Log Cabin

 

Again the logs are added in rounds, but this time, the sides are sliced at irregular angles before adding the next log.

 

 

While strips are useful to start with here, the width of the finished logs will be varied.  No two blocks will be the same!

 

This can be a really fun block to make if you like a little more ‘freedom’ in your piecing.  Just keep adding rounds until your block is a little bigger than you need, then square it off to the required size.

 

 

Here’s an example of a Wonky Log Cabin Quilt I made for Quilt Now Magazine several years ago.

 

Wonky Log Cabin Quilt (Quilt Now October17)

 

4 Curved:

To achieve a curved effect in a Log Cabin block, the background logs must be thinner than the coloured logs.

 

Curved Log Cabin

 

The curved effect becomes more obvious when you put 4 blocks together to create a ‘circle’:

 

Log Cabin Circles 006 (2)

 

The bigger the difference between the widths of the background and coloured logs, the greater the curve!

 

There are lots more variations of Log Cabin, like the Quarter Log Cabin (adding logs to the same two adjacent sides each round, rather than to all four sides) ….

 

Quarter Log Cabin cushion Tutorial

(Quarter Log Cabin Cushion tutorial available here.)

 

….. or how about starting your Log Cabin block with a different shape!!

 

Log Cabin Variations

 

These are definitely on my Quilts Bucket List!

 

And as if that’s not enough, check out my Log Cabin Pinterest board for lots more inspiration from around the Quilty Web!

 

Come back soon for part 2 of The Log Cabin Family of Blocks!

 

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