Pleated Bag – Class Project


By Judith on February 2, 2020
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In our current block of classes we are looking at tucks and pleats.

 

You may remember I had made 2 examples of tucks for our classes, but at the time was still working on a pleats sample.

 

And here it is:

 

For Pleats Sake Bag (class sample)

 

The pattern for this pleated bag is by Lisa Lam (U-handbag.com) and is called ‘For Pleats Sake!’.  You can find the free tutorial here.

 

For Pleats Sake Bag (class sample)

 

The tutorial doesn’t include quantities for the exterior and interior fabrics.

 

If you are using non-directional fabric you will need 0.5 metre of both.  However, if you have a direction to your pattern which follows the width of the bolt, you will need 0.75 metres.

 

And a further note on the fabrics.  I used ‘deco’ (decorating) weight fabric (or lightweight curtaining) from Ikea.  This fabric gives body to the bag, pleats beautifully and negates the need for interfacing or fusible fleece.

 

For Pleats Sake Bag (class sample)

 

I used the same weight for the lining (a vintage curtain) which also gets pleated. However if you wanted to use quilting weight cotton I recommend using a heavy weight sew-in stabiliser (rather than fusible fleece) on both the exterior and lining.  Spray baste the sew-in stabiliser rather than using a fusible heavy weight stabiliser as this could resist the light weight cotton and cause it to bubble.

 

For Pleats Sake Bag (class sample)

 

Sewing the faux leather handles through the exterior layers only can be tricky (the handles can’t be held in place with pins and the needle comes  out awkwardly between the exterior and lining!). So try sewing through both layers and covering the visible back stitching with glued on fabric or leather scraps.

P.s. you want to use really strong thread to sew on your handles, like linen, perle cotton or 6 strand embroidery floss.

 

For Pleats Sake Bag (class sample)

 

The bags currently being made in class are gorgeous! I can’t wait to show you them at half term, with the equally beautiful pleated pouches and cushions!  It’s a hive of wondrous activity!

(Want to know the difference between pleats and tucks?  See here)

 

Happy pleating!

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Take Wing Butterfly Wallhanging


By Judith on November 29, 2017
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It’s getting much colder here!  Brrrrr! Winter has most definitely arrived!

 

And it’s getting harder to photograph my projects outside – icy showers are never too far away!

 

Take Wing Butterfly wallhanging
24″ x 15″

 

For a while now I have been wanting to make Lillyella’s Take Wing Butterfly pattern. 

 

Butterflies hold symbolic meaning for me, and when I first saw Nicole’s Take Wing Butterfly, it took my breath away!

 

Take Wing Butterfly wallhanging

 

The butterfly is foundation paper pieced in 5 sections.  I LOVE foundation piecing because of the crisp, sharp points and lines you get from this technique.

 

And Nicole includes a really helpful colouring sheet, so you can colour in the sections of your butterfly first to get an idea of colour and fabric placement.

 

Take Wing Butterfly wallhanging

 

The fabrics I used were mostly Sunprints by Alison Glass, leftovers from a rainbow quilt I made in the summer.

 

Most of the pieced sections are small, so this would also be a great scrap-buster project.  And if you don’t fancy a wallhanging, it can easily be transformed into a beautiful cushion.

 

Take Wing Butterfly wallhanging

 

I will be teaching this next term as part of my new program of classes. I do hope you can join us for some foundation piecing fun!

 

Happy sewing!

 

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Denim Maker’s Tote


By Judith on June 18, 2017
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Hi everyone!

 

It’s getting pretty hot around here!

 

As I enjoy the wide open windows and the washing on the line, I’m also progressing well with packing up ready for moving house at the end of this month.  A small challenge when there’s 15 years worth of ‘stuff’ to thin out ready for our down-size!

 

I have also packed up my sewing room, but not before I got a class sample finished for classes in the new term.

 

Denim Maker's Tote (large)

 

I’m a great admirer of Anna’s fabulous bag designs and patterns, and her Maker’s Tote is a particular favourite of mine.  I’ve had it bookmarked for a while, but am only now getting around to making it!

 

Denim Maker's Tote (large)

 

I thought this would be a good bag pattern to teach in class because of the variety of bag construction elements and skills involved.

 

But of course I couldn’t just stick to the pattern, could I!

 

I love using denim for bags, it makes them more durable and useable in my view.  And besides, I already had 2 ‘uneven brick’ panels sewn together for another project long forgotten!  They were the perfect size, so I got to *quilting them, first in the ditches, and then some feature quilting using Aurifil 12wt wool thread.

 

*the original pattern uses a foam interfacing like Bosal to give structure and reinforcement to the bag.  I wasn’t able to get any in time, so substituted with a layer of wadding and heavy weight sew-in vilene spray basted together.

 

I used a size 100 Jeans needle for the quilting and construction

 

 

The front and back of my bag are slightly different.  I didn’t think the prescribed front pocket would work on my version of this bag, but I did include the zippered back pocket.

 

Denim Maker's Tote (large)

 

One of the joys of working with recycled denim is thinking of ways to use the loops, tabs and unusual features attached to a pair of jeans.

 

Self-covered button with vintage chintz

 

 

I decided my Maker’s Tote could be used as my everyday bag, not just a class sample, so I incorporated another one of my favourite textiles, vintage chintz linen.

 

Denim Maker's Tote (large)

 

A few vintage style Lecien prints coordinated beautifully for the internal pockets and facings.

 

Denim Maker's Tote (large)

 

The handles are made from a re-purposed denim belt, reinforced with webbing and lined with more of the chintz linen.

 

Denim Maker's Tote (large)

 

The belt was a little on the wide side, so by cinching in the edges along the top section, they are now the perfect fit for my hands and have lovely structure too!

 

Denim Maker's Tote (large)

 

The bag is finished off with self-made bias binding, another great skill to have under your belt.  If you follow me on Instagram, you will know that the first lot of bias binding I made is different to the one on the finished bag!

 

 

I decided I didn’t like choice no.1 (after I had attached it!). In my opinion the chintz linen binding works much better, even though it was a little trickier to attach.

 

So there we have my version of Noodlehead’s Maker’s Tote!  A fabulously roomy bag, gorgeous shape, and versatile elements.

 

And I’ll leave you with an ‘out take’ of the ‘helper’ on my photo-shoot!

 

Denim Maker's Tote (large)

 

Linking up to Nicky & Leanne’s Scraptastic Tuesday!

 

Happy Sewing!

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