Improv. Curved Placemats Tutorial


By Judith on May 4, 2018
3 Comments (Leave comment)

In keeping with our ‘curves’ theme this term, my monthly ‘5 minute lesson’ in classes this week was all about Improv. (improvisational) curves.

 

As the name suggests ‘improv.’ means you pretty much go with the flow and make up the curves as you go.  No two curves are the same, and there are much fewer rules to abide by than with standard pieced curves. You don’t even have to worry about an even seam allowance (gasp!).

 

You can imagine how well this technique went down with all my rebellious non-conformists (you know who you are!!).

 

There are many examples of improv. curves on Pinterest (see my Curves Pinterest Board here).  And to give an example of these in class, I made some improv. curved placemats, in the lovely coastal Beachcomber fabrics by Makower.

 

Improv Curves Placemat tutorial (2)

 

Here is the tutorial on how to make my Improv. Curved Placemats (makes 4 x 15 1/4″ diameter mats).

 

You will need:

Between Nine and Twelve 10″ squares (I used Beachcomber by Makower)

50cm of Wadding or Insul Bright Heat Resistant Wadding

50cm of calico

1 metre of Heat Resistant Non-Slip Table Protector (at least 35″ wide)

4.5 metres of 3/4″ wide bias binding

Co-ordinating threads

505 Basting Spray

 

Method: Assume 1/4″ seams

1 Place 2 squares of fabric on the cutting mat, right sides facing up, and overlapping.  The wider the overlap, the deeper the curves can be.  I usually overlap by 2-3″ (I am using up a smaller piece of fabric here to overlap the 10″ square).

 

 

2 Using a rotary cutter, cut a curve up through the overlapped section.

 

 

3 Remove the excess pieces (this will be the smaller piece of the right hand fabric and the smaller/underneath piece of the left hand fabric). The remaining pieces should fit neatly together.

 

 

4 Sew the 2 pieces right sides together.  It is easier to do this by straightening the underneath piece with your right hand and lifting up the top piece with your left hand.  Don’t worry if your seam allowance isn’t even the whole way down, just make sure there are no tucks.

 

 

5 Press the seam to the darkest fabric.

 

 

6 Repeat steps 2-5 for a third piece of fabric, over lapping the left hand edge of the first piece.

 

 

7 Spray baste the curved pieces, wadding and calico together (tutorial on spray basting available here).

 

 

8 Quilt the mats, starting centrally and working towards the outer edges.  I quilted in the ditches and then’echo’ quilted the curved seams 1/2″ apart.

 

 

9 Place a round plate or bowl on top and draw around it.  Cut along the line and remove the excess.  Put to one side.

 

 

10 Place the same plate/bowl onto the felted side of the non-slip table protector.  Draw around it and cut out.

 

 

11 Machine tack the table protector to the wrong side of the mat, making sure the felted side is on the inside. Machine tacking means using a large stitch on your machine, and stitching close to the edges.  If you find the rubberised table protector resisting or sticking to your sewing machine, make sure the rubberised side is facing up and engage the dual feed/walking foot on your machine.  If you don’t have these, stick some matt scotch tape to the underside of your presser foot keeping clear of the needle opening.

 

 

12 Open out the bias binding, and leaving a few inches unsewn at the start, attach the binding around the edge of the mat using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance, stopping a few inches short at the end (remember to use a quilting size stitch length here, not a tacking stitch).

 

 

13 Place the end of the bias binding over the start and measure and mark 1/2″ overlap.  Trim off the excess.

 

 

14 Open out the binding and sew the short ends together using 1/4″ seam allowance.

 

 

15 Finger press the seam open and finish sewing down the remaining binding to the mat.

16 Snip all around the edge of the mat at 1cm intervals, taking care not to cut the stitches.

 

 

17 Push the binding over to the back of the mat.  Pin in the ditch from the front, making sure the binding is caught at the back.

 

 

18 Stitch in the ditch from the front side finishing with a reverse stitch.

 

 

And you’re finished!

Improv Curves Placemats

 

Adorn your table with your beautiful mats and wait for the compliments!

 

Improv Curves Placemats

 

So why not have a go at this organic and fun technique!

 

I hope you enjoy your venture into improv. curves!

 

Happy curving!

Comments

3 Comments (Leave comment)

Easter Table (part 2)!


By Judith on March 16, 2018
0 Comments (Leave comment)

So, I’m going to completely ignore the impending snow forecast and pretend it is spring and enjoy my narcissus and daffs and the blissfulness of denial!

 

 

With just over 2 weeks to Easter, let’s crack on with part 2 of my classroom Easter table.

 

Garden Shed Tidy (Pretty Patches May16)

 

At the top right hand side of the picture, you will see my Garden Shed Tidy.

 

 

Sewing with clear vinyl isn’t as tricky as you might think!

 

 

This was made for the May ’16 issue of Pretty Patches magazine.  As the garden starts to come to life again, I get sporadic urges to amble down the ‘garden’ isles of my local homeware shop,  buying packets of seeds with renewed vigor that this year I will plant them (!!)

 

And if (like me) you aren’t much of a gardener, you could easily use this cute tidy in your bathroom, the teenagers room, or in the study keeping stamps, envelopes and stationery organised (people do still write letters, right?).

 

 

Hanging on my diy Easter tree are my Easter Egg Zippy Pouches, made with older children in mind who might prefer money or vouchers for Easter!  You can get the free tutorial here.

 

DIY Easter tree

 

Also hanging on my Easter tree are some crochet bunnies.  I followed this tutorial, however mine seem to resemble some kind of dysmorphic bat!

 

Harriet Hare Cushion

 

Now one of the cushions on my table is an old friend.  You may recognise her from this quilt!

 

Harriet Hare Cushion

 

My trusty Woodland Hare, Harriet, has been enlarged and appliqued onto a bespoke cushion cover.  She’s been stuffed and in the absence of piping cord, I top-stitched the side seams.

 

Seeing Harriet’s endearing smile always brings me joy!

 

Picnic Bobble Quilt (Popular Patchwork Aug16)

 

 

Finally, for part 2, all of these items are sitting on my Picnic Bobble Blanket.

 

This was another magazine commission, this time the August ’16 issue of Popular Patchwork.

 

It’s a great pattern for showing off a larger scale print.

 

Picnic Bobble Quilt (Popular Patchwork Aug16)

 

It is double backed, the outer layer being a machine washable shower curtain (we don’t want any soggy bottoms!).

 

Picnic Bobble Quilt (Popular Patchwork Aug16)

 

This is another pattern I will commit to re-write for general sale!

There is a lot of work involved in converting a pattern from a magazine template to one of my own formatted patterns.  I have a long ‘to do’ list and will be announcing some new releases soon!  Thank you for your patience.

 

There are still 2 projects left on the table to tell you about.  But I will give them a post all of their own!

 

In the meantime …..

 

Keeeeeeeeep sewing!

Comments

0 Comments (Leave comment)

Easter Table (part 1)!


By Judith on March 14, 2018
1 Comment (Leave comment)

When I was at Primary School we had a ‘Nature Table’, decorated according to the seasons, with items mucky hands would triumphantly find and trophy into class the next day!

 

The Autumn Table was my favourite.  I can still see the bright orangey-red ovals of rosehips, shining like jewels among the tattered leaves and empty conker casings.

 

Well I may be all grown up now (sort of!), but in the childhood-spirit of celebrating the season, I thought it would be nice to have an ‘Easter Table’ in class!

 

 

Not all of these items are strictly ‘Easter’ related – I’m using a little Spring inspiration (& a lot of creative license!) too.

 

So over the next 2 posts, let me talk you through my table and I’ll give you the links to the free tutorials too!

 

We’ll start with the left hand side of the table.  The items are sitting on my blue chenille mat.  If you’ve never tried chenilling before, I highly recommend it.  Great fun and super easy too!

 

Chenille

 

Chenille involves lots of layers of fabric, sewn together on the bias in half inch channels.  The fabric between the channels is then cut, through all layers except the bottom one.  Give it a rigorous wash and tumble dry, and hey presto, you have the fluffiest fabric which you can then turn into anything you like!

 

So far, I’ve chenilled a baby play mat,  a bath mat (below) and a heart cushion!

 

 

In my trug we have my Carrot Cornets ….

 

Easter Carrot Cornets tutorial
filled up with mini eggs!

 

 

……and my Bunny Bags ……..

 

Easter Bunny Bags tutorial

 

The large and small baskets are based on this tutorial by Pink Penguin.  These are so versatile, with a multitude of applications!

 

Easter Basket

 

Above the trug we have my easy cutesy baby bibs ….

 

 

… and my large and small Bunny Tote Bags.

 

 

These were made for Pretty Patches magazine last year.  One day I will get around to re-formatting the pattern for general sale!

 

And above these Bunny Tote Bags are my hanging Scented Houses.  I ran this as a workshop a few years ago, but I need to update the pattern. So it’s not available just at the moment, soz!

 

Scented Fabric Houses Feb13hang them in your wardrobe to keep clothes smelling fresh!

 

I think that’s enough to be getting on with!

 

Tune in later in the week for Easter Table Part 2!

 

I’ll leave you with my crocheted spring garland (another invention of mine for which I haven’t yet written the pattern! Soz again!).

 

 

Happy sewing!

Comments

1 Comment (Leave comment)

HSTs, QSTs and HRTs


By Judith on February 2, 2018
1 Comment (Leave comment)

Hi everyone!

In class this week, our ‘5 minute lesson’ was all about HSTs (Half Square Triangles), QSTs (Quarter Square Triangles) and HRTs (no not that type of HRT! Half Rectangle Triangles!).

 

 

These versatile and clever units form the many building blocks of quilt and quilt block design!

 

They are component parts that follow the same construction principles but with their many design possibilities, they just keep on giving!

 

Sewing with triangles can be tricky, especially as those naughty bias edges can flex and stretch!  But despite the word ‘triangle’ being mentioned in the names of all of these techniques, at no point are individual triangles sewn together! How cool is that!

 

Let’s start with the humble Half Square Triangle.

 

Half Square Triangles (HSTs):

 

Method 1 (yields 2 identical hsts):

 

Start off by putting 2 squares right sides together.

 

 

Draw a pencil line corner to corner on the wrong side of one of the squares and sew 1/4″ either side of the line.

 

 

Cut along the line to create 2 identical half square triangle units.  Press the seams open (always press bias seams open where possible).

 

 

How easy was that!

Method 2 (yields 4 identical hsts):

Place 2 squares right sides together and sew 1/4″ around all four sides.

 

 

Cut in half from corner to corner, and then into quarters through the opposite corners.

 

 

As before, press the seams open.

 

 

And now that you have cracked hsts, the design possibilities are endless!  Here are a couple of my own HST quilts, but for lots more variations, including sizing charts, check out my HST Pinterest Board!

 

Autumn Boho Quilt (British Patchwork & Quilting Sept17)
Autumn Boho Quilt made with giant hsts!

Chevron Heaven Quilt (April17 Popular Patchwork Magazine)
Chevron Heaven!

 

Houndstooth Quilt for LPQ (Nov16)
Modern Houndstooth – hsts and squares
Rainbow Geese (photo courtesy of Sewing World magazine)

 

 

Quarter Square Triangles (QSTs):

This time you need 2 lots of half square triangles.  You can work with 2 fabrics, or like I’m doing here, 4 different fabrics.

 

 

Now take 1 hst from each pair and place them right sides together so that their seams are lying on top of each other.

 

 

Draw a line corner to corner perpendicular to the existing seam. Sew 1/4″ either side of the line.

 

 

Cut along the line to separate and press the seams open.  Now you have 2 identical QST blocks, with each of the 4 fabrics in each unit.

 

 

See if you can spot the QSTs in my friend Susan’s gorgeous ‘Blue Moon’ quilt.

 

 

I have a little QST quilt in the works, but I can only show you this sneaky peak  for now ……..

 

 

….. but check out my QST Pinterest board for lots more clever ideas & sizing charts!

 

Half Rectangle Triangles (HRTs):

As with HSTs and QSTs we will be sewing either side of a diagonal pencil line, but this time, because we are working with rectangles, the layering is different.

 

 

Placing the fabrics right sides together, make sure the pencil line runs to the opposite corners of the other rectangle.

When these have been sewn, separated and pressed, you will need to trim off the excess fabric at the corners before using them.

 

 

And if you change the direction of the pencil line in other units, you can achieve lots of different effects.  Here’s a little Twizzler block I made for the class lesson.

 

 

I haven’t made an HRT quilt yet, but it is most definitely on my bucket list!

But please check out my HRT Pinterest board for inspiration overload! Oh my! I want to make them all!

If you’ve always wanted to design your own quilts but have been unsure of where to start, then why not give HSTs, QSTs or HRTs a try!

I hope you feel inspired!  Thank you for tuning in!

Happy sewing!

 

 

Comments

1 Comment (Leave comment)

Travel Sewing Pouch Tutorial


By Judith on January 20, 2018
1 Comment (Leave comment)

Happy weekend everyone!

 

I hope you’ve had a good week.

 

How would you fancy another Just Jude Designs tutorial!  It’s been a while so I thought it was time to share one of my handy pouch patterns!

 

 

If you attend regular sewing classes, a Quilting Guild or charity sewing groups, you will know there’s a lot of stuff to remember to bring with you each time!

 

7.5” x 17.5” (19cm x 44.5cm) opened;  7.5” x 9” (19cm x 23cm) closed

 

So a travel sewing pouch might be just the thing you need to keep your essentials compact and portable.

 

 

And there’s a handy little zippered pocket in the back!

 

So before we get started, here are a few essential points:

 

  • Use quarter inch seams throughout
  • Avoid directional prints for the main/outer fabric (it will be upside down when the flap folds over – ask me how I know!!)
  • All cutting instructions are shown width x height

 

Right, let’s go!

 

Materials/Cutting:

For main/outer/flap cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 17”/43cm)

For front/small pocket cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 10”/25.5cm)

For lining cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 17”/43cm)

For medium pocket cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 13”/33cm)

For large pocket cut:  1 x (8”/20cm x 16”/40.5cm)

For zippered pocket lining cut:  2 x (8”/20cm x 9”/23cm)

From sew-in vilene cut:   1 x (8”/20cm x 17”/43cm)

You will also need:

Elastic hair bobble

Button

Basting Spray (505)

5” plastic zipper

Zipper foot

Non-permanent marking pen/tool

 

Method:

1 Spray baste the vilene to the wrong side of the main/outer fabric.

 

2 Iron all 3 pockets in half widthways, wrong sides together. Top stitch along top/folded edges.

 

 

 

3 Place the small and medium pockets together (aligned at the bottom & side edges). Chalk & sew lines onto the small pocket to create dividers as required. Use a reverse stitch at the top/folded edge. Do not sew a central line through all layers as this will be sewn in the next step.

 

 

4 Place the small and medium pockets on top of the large pocket, again aligning bottom and side edges. Mark a line that runs vertically through the middle of the small and medium pockets only. Sew on this line, through all layers, again using a reverse stitch at the top edge.

 

 

5 Place the pocket section on top of the lining (right side facing) aligning the bottom and side edges. Machine tack together. Put to one side.

 

 

 

6 Make the back/zippered pocket: Hand or machine stitch the open end of the zipper closed to hold in place.

 

 

7 Place one of the zippered pocket linings right sides together with the outer fabric, aligning the bottom and side edges.

Draw a line on the pocket fabric, 2” (5cm) down from the top and 1.5” (4cm) in from each side.

 

 

8 Next draw a line ¼” (6mm) above and below the first line. Join up the sides and draw > shapes ¼” (6mm) in from each side.

 

 

9 Pin the layers together and sew on the outer lines only through both layers. Do not sew on the centre line.

 

 

10 Carefully cut along the centre line and > lines into the corners. You need to cut right into the corners without snipping the stitches.  A small pair of embroidery stitches are useful here.

 

 

11 Push the pocket fabric through the letterbox opening to the back. Press well so no pocket fabric is seen.

 

 

12 Place the zipper into the letterbox opening, so that the ‘teeth’ are showing on the right side. Pin and carefully sew around the opening using 1/8” (3mm) seam allowance.

 

 

13 Pin the remaining pocket lining piece right sides together with the first pocket lining piece. Do not pin through to the main/outer fabric.

 

 

14 Clip or pin the outer fabric back out of the way before sewing around all sides of the pocket linings.

 

 

15 Complete the pouch: Machine or hand tack an elastic hair bobble to the top edge of the outer fabric, centred and with the main loop pointing down.

 

 

16 Place the outer piece right sides together with the lining/pockets. Pin and sew around all edges, leaving a 3” (8cm) gap in the top of one of the sides. Carefully snip the corners at an angle to remove the bulk.

 

 

 

17 Turn the pouch right sides out, push the corners well out and press well.

18 Hand stitch the gap closed and sew on a button 2” (5cm) up from the bottom edge and centred.

 

 

Fill with all your sewing essentials!

 

 

Happy sewing!

 

Comments

1 Comment (Leave comment)

‘Thank You’ from Macmillan Cancer Support


By Judith on October 3, 2017
1 Comment (Leave comment)

Hello everyone!

 

Happy October to you all!  The beauty of Autumn has arrived here in N.Ireland.  Aren’t the leaves just gorgeous this time of year!

 

 

Many of you have been beavering away making Syringe Driver Bags for Macmillan Cancer Support.

 

 

I want to say a huge thank you for your contributions so far!  More are needed on an ongoing basis, so if you get a spare 5 minutes to rustle up another one, we’d much appreciate it (you can get the tutorial here).

 

And here’s a thank you from the staff at Macmillan (modelling some of your bags!):

 

 

“Hi Judith, just to say a big thank you for the syringe driver bags we’re getting at the Macmillan unit. This is a few of the staff modelling them!!! They’re amazing! The workmanship is incredible! You have some very talented connections! Please pass on our thanks… so nice to offer something cheery and have a bit of choice when you have an attachment to carry around that you’re not that excited about!! BIG THANK YOU!!!! X”

 

What a great way to make a small difference in someone’s life.

 

Happy sewing!

 

Comments

1 Comment (Leave comment)

Selvedge Bookmark Tutorial


By Judith on September 17, 2017
4 Comments (Leave comment)

Hello everyone!

 

How are you doing?

 

I haven’t done a tutorial here in a long while, so I thought it was time to rectify that.

 

 

You know how I’m always saving fabric scraps? Well I even keep the part of the fabric most people chuck away!

 

If like me you love to read, or know an avid reader, how about a selvedge bookmark? The perfect fabric/book loving combo!!

 

The key to keeping usable selvedges is to allow at least a quarter of an inch of fabric above the text (the edge below the text is a sealed edge, not a raw edge).

 

 

Here’s the tutorial:

 

Materials:

 

A selection of selvedges (with at least 6mm/0.25” above the text)

4” x 10” piece of heavy sew-in vilene (or wadding)

4” x 10” piece of cotton fabric (back)

1 x 10mm eyelet

12” length of narrow ribbon

 

Method:

Assume ¼” seam allowance unless advised otherwise

 

  1. Angle the top corners of the vilene/wadding by measuring 1” from each corner along the top edge and 2” down from each corner along the sides

 

 

2. Place your first selvedge level with the bottom edge of the vilene/wadding (remember ¼” will be absorbed by the seam allowance).

 

 

3. Place the next selvedge on top, with the sealed edge covering the raw edge of the first selvedge. Stitch close to the sealed edge.

 

 

4. Continue adding selvedges in this way until all of the vilene/wadding is covered.

 

 

5. Flip the bookmark over to reveal the original shape of the vilene/wadding. Trim away the excess selvedges.

 

 

6. Place the backing fabric right sides together with the bookmark and sew around all sides, leaving a 2” gap in the middle of the bottom edge. Trim away the corners.

 

 

7.  Turn the bookmark right sides out through the gap in the lining. Push the corners well out and press.  Press under the raw edges of the gap.

 

8. Top stitch 1/8” from the edges on all sides, closing the gap as you go.

 

 

9. Insert an eyelet at the top of the bookmark, using the manufacturer’s instructions.

 

 

10. Thread the ribbon through the eyelet and knot to secure.

 

And you’re done!

 

 

Time to curl up in a squishy sofa, with a snuggly quilt and hot chocolate, and allow a good book to take you and your imagination to far flung places!

 

Happy selvedging!

 

Comments

4 Comments (Leave comment)

Syringe Driver Bags Tutorial


By Judith on August 23, 2017
6 Comments (Leave comment)

Hi everyone!  How are you doing this week?

 

Summer seems to have left us here!  But I have some good news!  My sewing room is finished and I’m fully operational once more!

 

And what better project to christen my new creative space than sewing for a good cause.

 

 

These are Syringe Driver Bags, used by patients to keep essential medication on their person as they move around. Earlier this year we received a request from Marie Curie Cancer Care to make Syringe Driver Bags for their unit in Belfast.  The response from the sewing community was incredible, and we donated enough bags for the hospice and a local hospital cancer unit.

 

Well I’m putting out a call to all generous and creative sewers, to make more Syringe Driver Bags, this time for Macmillan Cancer Support unit in Antrim hospital.

 

I have been approached to make these bags, for current and future patients in the unit, and any bags donated over and above what is needed will be shared around the other cancer units too.

 

The bags required this time around are for adult males and females, in bright, cheery fabrics, and come in 2 sizes.  The small bag takes a single syringe driver and the large bag takes 2 drivers.  Both sizes have a velcro flap, and while the dimensions vary, the construction method is the same for each.

 

I do hope I can count on your generous spirit to support brave patients in this small way.

 

Here is the tutorial:

Measurements listed are width x height

Use 1/4″ seam allowance

Use reverse stitch to start and finish each seam

 

 

  1. Make the Handle:  Iron under 1/4″ along each long edge.

 

 

2. Now bring both long (folded) edges together and press. Top stitch 1/8″ from the edge down both long sides, starting with the open side. No need to top stitch the short ends. Put the handle to one side.

 

 

3. Make the Flap: Place the outer and lining flaps right sides together. Sew around 3 sides, leaving one short side open.

 

 

4. Carefully snip the corners at an angle (to reduce bulk) before turning right side out.  Push the corners well out and press.

 

5. Sew the soft side of the velcro to the lining side of the flap, 1/4″ away from the closed end of the flap.  Put to one side.

 

 

6. Make the main bag: Attach the remaining piece of velcro to the front bag piece. The top of the velcro should be 1.5″ down from the top edge (or 2″ for the large bag).

 

 

7. Join the front and back pieces and the sides, right sides together (as shown) stopping 1/4″ short at the bottom of each seam.

 

 

8. Join the remaining edges together to create a box (remember to stop 1/4″ short at the bottom).

 

 

9. Insert the base: Pin the base to the bottom of the outer bag, right sides together.

 

 

10. Sew the base in place, stopping 1/4″ short at each corner to pivot & turn (leave the needle down in the fabric and lift up the presser foot).  As you pivot the corners, flip the underside of the bag away from you (see below).

 

 

Stop 1/4″ short at the corner, leave needle down, lift up presser foot and turn.
While presser foot is raised, flip underside of fabric away from you. Return presser foot and continue sewing next side.

11. Turn the bag right side out. Push the corners out and press the seams into a nice box shape.

 

 

12. Machine tack the flap onto the back of the bag, right sides together.

 

 

13. Machine tack the handle onto the sides of the bag (take care not to get a twist in your handle). Put to one side.

 

 

14. Make the lining: Repeat steps 7-10 for the lining, leaving a 2″ gap in a long side seam. Do not turn right side out.

 

 

15. Insert the outer bag into the lining, tucking the flap and handle inside between the layers. Align & pin the side seams and top edge.

 

 

16. Sew around the top edge (you may find it easier to remove the accessories tray on your machine here).

 

 

17. Pull the outer bag through the gap in the lining, and hand or machine stitch the gap closed.

 

 

18. Press the bag before pushing the lining into the outer bag. Sew around the top edge again, making sure to keep the flap and handle well out of the way.

 

 

And you’re done!

 

 

It would be wonderful if you could help me with this small measure of kindness.  The 2  bags I’ve made have already brought smiles to the faces of the 2 recipients!

 

I will be the collection point for any donated bags, so please get in touch with me directly and I’ll give you my address (justjudedesigns@hotmail.co.uk)

 

Thanking you all in advance of your support and generosity.

 

Comments

6 Comments (Leave comment)

Flex Frame Sunglasses Case Tutorial


By Judith on May 15, 2017
1 Comment (Leave comment)

Hello everyone!  I hope you’ve had a wonderful weekend.

 

With all the sunshine we’ve been having lately, I thought it was time I shared my Sunglasses Case pattern with you.

 

 

If you are new to the world of ‘flex frames’ don’t worry, they are really easy to insert, and there are lots of pictures to help you along.

 

Of course you can use these handy cases for regular spectacles, they make lovely gifts too!

 

 

But a sunnies case is embracing of the imminent summer season and will get us all in the mood for when the sun comes out again!

 

Good To Know:

There are 2 sizes available.  This is because not all sunglasses fold flat.  If they do, like normal glasses then you need to make the narrower case using a 3.5″ flex frame (available from here).

 

 

However, if your sunglasses are wrap around ones (like mine), you will need to make the wider case using a 5″ flex frame. Now it’s a little more tricky to get hold of these within the UK.  However they are widely available from Hong Kong and China via Ebay (remember, Hong Kong is a country with a pre-paid Import charge agreement with the UK, so no customs charges will apply on your parcel).

The construction method is the same for both sizes.

 

 

So let’s get started.

 

You will need:

First of all, you will need to download the applique glasses template here.

3.5″ or 5″ Flex Frame

Narrow case: 2 x (4″ x 9″) each from outer fabric, lining fabric & sew-in vilene (heavy weight)

Wider case: 2 x (5.5″ x 9″) each from outer fabric, lining fabric & sew-in vilene (heavy weight)

Fabric for applique sunglasses (2.5″ x 5″)

Bondaweb (2.5″ x 5″)

Jewellery pliers or similar

Adjustable zipper foot (this makes sewing in the flex frame easier)

505 Basting spray (optional)

 

Method:

Assume 1/4″ seam allowances 

 

1. Spray baste the vilene to the wrong sides of the outer fabric pieces.  Using the template provided, trace onto the papery side of the bondaweb.

 

2. Iron the bondaweb to the wrong side of the applique glasses fabric. When cooled, cut out on the line.

 

 

3. Remove the paper backing and carefully iron the glasses to the right side of the outer fabric, centred and approx. 2.5cm (1”) up from the bottom edge.

 

 

4. Applique the glasses according to your preferred method. I used raw edge ‘sketch’ applique – for this you need to drop the feed dogs and attach a free motion/darning foot to your machine (you can get more information on how to do this & other machine applique techniques here.)

 

 

5. Put the 2 outer pieces right sides together and mark 6.75cm (2 5/8″) down from both top corners. Sew down both sides and the bottom edge from marker to marker, leaving the top open (this is the flex frame section).

 

 

6. Repeat step 5 for both lining pieces, leaving a 5cm (2”) gap in the middle of the bottom edge (for turning).

 

7. With right sides together, match the outer flaps to the lining flaps.

 

 

8. Carefully pin these sections as shown below, making sure to match the side seams.

 

 

9. Sew around the top unsewn section from pin to pin.  Use a reverse stitch to start and finish and take care not to sew into the existing seams.  Repeat for the other flap.

 

 

10. Carefully snip the corners at an angle to lessen the bulk.

 

 

11. Turn the pouch right side out through the gap in the lining. Push the corners well out and press flat. Hand or machine stitch the gap closed.

 

 

12. Push the lining down into the case. Fold back one of the ‘flaps’, pin and sew close to the outer edge to create a channel (an adjustable zipper foot is useful here).  Start and finish with a reverse stitch. Repeat for the other ‘flap’.

 

 

13. Insert the flex frame into the channels.

 

 

14. Push back the fabric to expose the open ends of the flex frame.  Slot the hinge together, insert the bar fully into the hinge, and then close the ends of the hinge using jewellery pliers.  Resettle the fabric along the flex frame.

 

 

Simples!

 

Pop in your sunglasses and enjoy!

 

 

Happy sewing!

Comments

1 Comment (Leave comment)

Siblings Together Wonky Star Quilt


By Judith on April 18, 2017
2 Comments (Leave comment)

In the Siblings Together Quilting Bee (2) I took a 2nd turn at Queen Bee for February.

 

STB2 February '17 Block

 

Spurred on by Sue’s donated wonky star blocks, we all embraced our inner ‘wonk’ and made lots more bright and beautiful star blocks.

 

And here is the finished quilt:

 

STB2 Wonky Star Quilt

 

What a blast of colour!

 

I’ve a few thank you’s to mention with regards to this quilt.

 

STB2 Wonky Star Quilt

 

Firstly a big thank you goes out to Sue and my bee mates for contributing lots of blocks to make this colourful quilt a possibility.

 

And also thanks to a good friend for quilting it so beautifully too!

 

STB2 Wonky Star Quilt

 

Finally, thank you to Sarah (Narcoleptic in a Cupboard) for contributing the Ikea backing.  It was the perfect backing for the scrappy mix of colours in the front!

 

STB2 Wonky Star Quilt

 

Measuring 60″ x 72″, this quilt will be going in the post this week well in time for this year’s summer camps.  It is sent with our love and blessings, knowing that it will bring comfort to a young person separated from her siblings by the care system.

 

You can read more about Siblings Together here.

 

And if you’d like to have a go at making your own wonky star blocks, you can get the tutorial here.

 

Happy sewing!

Comments

2 Comments (Leave comment)

Easter Bunny Bags Tutorial


By Judith on March 29, 2017
11 Comments (Leave comment)

Hello and welcome to Just Jude Designs, especially if you are here as one of the 2017 Finish-a-long participants.

 

As one of the new hosts this year, it’s is my privilege to share with you a tutorial to keep you inspired during our first Tutorial Week!

 

With Easter not too far away, I thought you might like a quick make that oozes cuteness and gives you nifty way to gift to your ‘chocolate loving’ friends and family!

 

 

Finishing at 4″ wide by 7″ tall (incl. ears!), they are the perfect size for filling with small chocolates and eggs!

 

Here’s how to make them:

You will need:

Outer Fabric: 2 x (6″ wide by 8″ tall)
Lining Fabric: 2 x (6″ wide by 8″ tall)
Ears front: 2 x (2.5″ wide by 4.5″ tall)
Ears back: 2 x (2.5″ wide by 4.5″ tall)
Lightweight iron-on vilene: 1 x (2.5″ x 9″)
0.5″ wide ribbon: 2 x 17″
small safety pin

 

Assume 1/4″ seams

Download ‘Ear’ template here.

 

1. Iron the vilene onto the wrong sides of 2 matching ear fabrics. Cut the 2 pieces apart. Using the ears template, draw an ‘ear’ onto the wrong sides of the other ear fabrics.

 

2. Place (different) ear fabrics right sides together and sew on pencil line (use a reverse stitch to start and finish). Trim away excess fabric, leaving 1/8″ seam allowance.

 

3. Turn the ears right sides out, press and turn under the open ends. Sew across the ends as close to the edges as you can.  Put to one side.

 

4. Place the outer fabrics right sides together.  Mark 2″ down from both top corners.

 

5. Sew around sides and bottom from marker to marker.  Repeat for the 2 lining pieces, but leave a 2″ gap in the bottom edge.

 

6. Pull the corners apart and place the side seam on top of the bottom seam. Measure 1″ along the seam from the point (this will give you 2″ vertically).  Mark the vertical line and sew along this line. Repeat for both corners on outer bag and lining.

 

7. Place the top ‘flaps’ right sides together, outer fabric with lining. Pin at the point where the side seams meet.

 

8. Sew around both ‘flaps’ between pins at both sides. Use a reverse stitch to start and finish, and take care not to sew into the existing seam.

 

9. Turn bag right side out through the gap in the lining. Hand or machine stitch the gap closed and press well.

 

10. Press the flaps under by approx. 0.5″ or until they reach the side seams. Pin and sew one flap down (as close to the edge as possible).  Use a reverse stitch to start and finish.

 

11. Pin the ears onto the remaining (turned under) flap leaving approx. 1″ between the ears at the bottom. Sew along the edge of the flap and along the bottom of the ears. Use a reverse stitch to start and finish.

 

12. Attach the safety pin to one end of the ribbon and pass through both channels until it comes out the same side where you started.

 

13. Knot the ribbon ends together and repeat for the other piece of ribbon from the opposite side.

 

And you’re finished!
Fill up the bag with chocolate goodies and pull the drawstrings to close!
(I guarantee you it won’t stay closed for long!!)
And for more fantastic tutorials this week, check out this list:

 

Don’t forget to link up your Q1 finishes here, before 1st April.

 

Happy (Easter) sewing!

Comments

11 Comments (Leave comment)

Wonky Star Block Tutorial


By Judith on January 31, 2017
1 Comment (Leave comment)

I get to be ‘Queen Bee’ again for February in Siblings Together Bee 2.

 

And thanks to Sue (a fellow bee mate), I hit on the perfect idea for which block to set.

 

 

A while a go Sue offered up her UFO (unfinished objects) pile of wonky star blocks, some made and some still in pieces.

 

I happily relieved them from her as a potential Siblings Together quilt!

 

 

These are super quick and easy blocks to make.  And here is the tutorial for my ST peeps and anyone else who fancies making this scrappy block.

 

Makes 1 x 12.5″ unfinished block

Use 1/4″ seam allowance

Cut out:

4 x 4.5″ squares of dark fabrics

4 x 4.5″ squares of light fabrics (same colourway as dark fabrics)

1 x 4.5″ square of white fabric (centre square)

4 x 4.5″ squares of white fabric, cut in half diagonally (star points)

Method:

1. Put the 4 light squares to one side. These will become the 4 corners.

2. Take a dark square and position a white triangle on it as shown (doesn’t have to be exact positioning). Sew along the diagonal edge of the white triangle, taking care not to stretch the bias edge.

 

 

3. Cut away the excess dark fabric at the corner, level with the white fabric.

 

 

4. Press the seam towards the dark fabric.

 

 

5. Position the 2nd white triangle diagonally across the first white triangle as shown (make sure the lower tip of the 2nd triangle extends past the bottom edge of the dark square). Again sew along the diagonal edge of the 2nd triangle.

 

 

6. Cut away the excess of both dark and white fabrics at the corner, level with the 2nd triangle.

 

 

7. Press the seam towards the dark fabric.

 

 

8. Place the unit onto your cutting mat, with the white triangles positioned at the top. Place a small square ruler on top, aligning the bottom & right hand edges of the block with the 4.5″ lines on the ruler. Trim the top and right hand edges of the block.

 

 

9. Turn the unit 180 degrees and repeat the trimming for the ‘new’ right hand edge. The unit should now measure 4.5″ square.

 

 

10. Repeat steps 2 – 9 3 more times.

11. Layout the block units in 3 rows as shown. Sew the units right sides together in each row.

 

 

12. Press the seams of rows 1 and 3 AWAY from the centre. Press the seams of row 2 TOWARDS the centre.

 

 

13. Join the rows right sides together, taking care to butt/nest the intersecting seams. Press all new seams open.  The block should measure 12.5″ square.

 

 

Thanking my ST buddies in advance!  Looking forward to receiving these colourful scrappy blocks.

Happy sewing!

Comments

1 Comment (Leave comment)

6 Christmas Stocking Filler Tutorials


By Judith on December 14, 2016
2 Comments (Leave comment)

Often the smallest and quickest sewing projects can bring the most pleasure.

 

I’ve curated some of my free tutorials for you, in a ‘Stocking Filler’ collection!

 

 

Who wouldn’t love a framed purse in their stocking, or a handy little glasses case?

 

Framed Purses (2.5″ x 6″)
Flex Frame Pouches

 

Keyfobs are such a useful accessory, as our my stacking nesting boxes (you can use these on desks for stationery or for keeping those beauty essentials organised on a dressing table!).

 

 

My towel backed bibs make sure the youngest members aren’t excluded (yes of course they have their own stocking!). Make them in cute Christmas fabrics for ‘baby’s first Christmas’!

 

Baby Bibs
Use 2.5″ squares for these festive patchwork bibs

 

And if you need to create a little more intrigue for a small gift, pop it into one of my gift bags! Isn’t the opening of presents just as much fun as the presents themselves?

 

 

Christmas Gift Bags

 

You can find even more Christmas themed tutorials here on my tutorials page.

 

And check out my new Christmas tutorials Pinterest board for more ideas from around the web!

 

Now you’ll never be stuck for super seasonal sewing stocking stuffers! (try saying that after a few Baileys!)

 

Happy sewing!

 

 

Comments

2 Comments (Leave comment)

Gift Bag Tutorial


By Judith on November 26, 2016
3 Comments (Leave comment)

It’s wonderful to see so many folks entering my Tula Pink giveaway.

 

p1130050

 

If you haven’t already entered, just sign up for my newsletter (right) and/or like my Facebook page here.

 

So Christmas is sneaking up quickly, and I thought you might like a quick and easy Christmas tutorial.

 

christmas-gift-bag-tutorial-jpg

 

 

How cute are these gift bags?

They are fully lined and stand at 7″ tall. Perfect for jazzing up those smaller (but no less important) gifts!

 

So let’s get started.  Here’s what you need:

 

Outside: 2 x (7.5″ wide x 10.5″ tall)

Lining: 2 x (7.5″ wide x 10.5″ tall)

Channel: 2 x (2″ wide x 8″ tall) or use 1″ wide ribbon

Drawstring: 2 x 20″ lengths of narrow ribbon

Safety pin

Small square ruler

 

p1130021

 

Method:

Assume 1/4″ seam allowances

 

1  Place both outside pieces right sides together. Sew around the side and bottom edges. Repeat for the 2 lining pieces, but this time leave a 2″ gap in the middle of the bottom edge.

 

presentation1

 

2  Make box corners: Pull the corners apart and place the side seam on top of the bottom seam. Place the ruler on top of the corner and measure and mark 3″ vertically (or 1.5″ from tip horizontally).

 

p1130025

 

3  Sew along the line, starting and finishing with a reverse stitch. Repeat for all 4 corners. (I like to trim off the excess from the lining, but leave the corners on the outers for a ‘stronger bottom’!)

 

p1130027

 

4  Turn the outer bag right side out (leave the lining inside out).

 

5  Place the outer bag inside the lining. Match and pin the side seams and top edges.

 

p1130028

 

6  Sew around the top edge (you will find this easier if you remove the accessory tray). Start and finish with a reverse stitch.

 

p1130029

 

7  Turn the bag right side out through the gap in the lining.  Push the corners out and stitch the gap in the lining closed.

 

p1130031

 

8  Push the lining into the bag and press the top edge to neaten.

 

p1130032

 

9  Make the Channel: Press under the short ends of each piece by 1/4″. Also press under both long sides by 0.5″.

 

p1130034

 

10  Pin the channels to the bag. The top edge of the channel will be 1.5″ down from the top of the bag.  Don’t worry if there is a little gap at the sides.

 

p1130036

 

p1130037

 

11  Slide the bag into your machine (without the accessory tray) and sew around the top and bottom edges of the channel, 1/8″ seam away from the edge.  Rather than stopping at the sides, just continue sewing onto the next channel. Start and finish with a reverse stitch.

 

p1130038

 

12  Finishing: Attach the safety pin to one end of a piece of ribbon. Thread the pin into the channel at one side, all the way around and out the same side.  Knot the ends of the ribbon together.

 

p1130040

 

p1130041

 

13  Thread the other piece of ribbon in the same way, this time from the opposite side.

 

p1130042

 

14  And you’re done!  Fill with goodies and make lots more!

 

p1130048

 

 

Happy sewing!

signature

Comments

3 Comments (Leave comment)

6 Free Back to School Tutorials


By Judith on September 1, 2016
0 Comments (Leave comment)

School’s back in session! (I can hear all the parents cheering from here!)
When my kids were younger, we all enjoyed the ‘stationery shop’, filling up new pencil cases with brightly coloured pencils, funky shaped sharpeners and rubbers, new files and bendy rulers!
But most of all I enjoyed making them items they could use for school.
 6 Free Back to School Tutorials

Here are 6 of my ‘back to school’ projects to keep your kids equipped (& the envy of their friends!).

And there’s even more temptation inspiration here on my ‘Back to School’ Pinterest board.

Happy sewing!

signature

 

Comments

0 Comments (Leave comment)

Mini Easter Baskets Tutorial (& more)!


By Judith on March 22, 2016
0 Comments (Leave comment)

It’s so lovely having my ‘Uni daughter’ back home for a wee while.

Fun with Family
We visited one of our all time favourite places (Mountstewart, Co.Down) today, and took some wonderful pics.  But more on that another day!
Today’s post is all about this wee bundle of goodness:
Easter Basket
Now I can’t take credit for this basket pattern, the original tutorial is here. It is quick and easy to make and great for using up tiny scraps.
Easter Basket

And if you don’t want to work with 2″ squares, you could vary the pattern using 6 x 3.5″ squares, or no squares at all!

And here are more free Easter tutorials from Blogland you might enjoy!

Felt Daffodils by Abby Glassenberg (While She Naps)
Applique Easter Basket by Peta (She Quilts A lot)
Fabric Basket and Eggs by Amy Smart (Diary of a Quilter)
Bunny Face Bag by Veronica (Sew Very)
Scrap Fabric Bunny Softie by Kim (Seven Thirty Three)
Fabric Birds by Hobbycraft

And as if that’s not enough, there are lot’s more tutorials on my Easter Pinterest Board – as well as my previous Easter tutorials. Go check them out!  There’s something for everyone!

So that marks the end of my mini Easter series of tutorials.

I hope you have enjoyed them! You still have a few days left before Easter to make them, so don’t panic!

Happy Sewing!

Jude xo

Comments

0 Comments (Leave comment)

Easter Egg Zippy Pouches Tutorial!


By Judith on March 18, 2016
0 Comments (Leave comment)

Thank you to everyone who has been following along with my Easter mini series!

You can find previous tutorials here:

Easter Bunny Bags
Easter Baby Bibs
Carrot Cornets

Apologies if you have had trouble downloading the PDF templates.  I have amended the ‘sharing’ settings within GoogleDocs so I hope from now on you will find it a little easier.  Please don’t hesitate to get in touch otherwise.

One final bit of housekeeping before we move on to another Easter tutorial.  I’m always grateful to folks who take the time to leave a comment here on my blog.  I will ALWAYS reply to comments, so if you don’t get a response from me, it’s because your email address doesn’t register with your comment.  In blogging terms you are known as a ‘no reply comment’ blogger. If this is you, I would love to be able to connect and chat with you more, so here and here are some tips you can try to fix your settings.  Alternatively, just leave me your email address with your comment (especially important when entering giveaways!).

On to our next Easter Tutorial!

Easter Egg Zippy pouches tutorial

Easter Egg Zippy Pouches!

This one is for older (or grown up) kids! As you can see, this is a fun way to gift money or vouchers!

And here’s how to make them:

What you need:

Front:
From outer and lining fabrics & sew-in vilene (med/heavy) cut 2 x (5″ wide by 3.5″ tall)
Back:
From outer and lining fabrics & sew-in vilene (med/heavy) cut 2 x (5″ wide by 6″ tall)
5″ plastic zipper (or longer)
1.25″ wide key fob
Basting spray 505
Zipper foot

Assume 1/4″ seams

Download the ‘Egg’ template here.

1. Spray baste the vilene to the wrong sides of the corresponding outer pieces.

2. Place the zipper right sides together along the top edge of a 5″  x  3.5″ outer/front piece.

3. Pin a corresponding lining piece on top, right sides together with the outer fabric.

4. Using the zipper foot, sew through all layers.

5. Flip the lining over to the back and press away from the zipper.  From the front side, sew 1/8″ finishing seam beside the zipper.

6. Now lay the other outer (front) piece on the table, right side facing.  Place the zippered piece right sides together with the zipper aligned at the top edge.

7. Pin the remaining corresponding lining piece on top, right sides together with the attached lining piece.  Sew through all layers as before.

8. Again flip the lining to the back side, press and sew a finishing seam 1/8″ away from the zipper.  Your pouch front should look something like this.

9. Place the template onto the lining side and draw around with a pencil.  Before cutting out on the line, bring the zipper pull inside the pouch and sew a few stitches across the zipper (just inside the line) to secure.

10. Place the outer/vilene back piece WRONG sides together with the corresponding lining piece.

11.  Place right sides together with the egg front.  Pin and sew 1/4″ inside the edge.

12. Trim away the excess and zigzag the raw edges.

13. Turn the pouch right side out through the zipper and press well.

14. Attach the keyfob & ring to the top of the ‘egg’.

Stuff with money, goodies (or diamonds!) and gift to your favourite big person!!

Easter Egg Zippy pouches tutorial

Happy Zipping!

Jude xo

Comments

0 Comments (Leave comment)

Carrot Cornets!


By Judith on March 17, 2016
0 Comments (Leave comment)

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Ready for another Easter Tutorial?

Easter Carrot Cornets tutorial

 


Today we are making Carrot Cornets!

Aren’t they cute, and perfect for little chocolate eggs (& fingers!).

Here’s what you need for 1 cornet:

Outer:
2 x (6.5″ wide by 8″ tall) orange fabric
2 x (6.5″ wide by 3.5″ tall) green fabric

Lining:
2 x (6.5″ wide by 10.5″ tall)

Ribbon:
1 x (0.25″ wide by 18″)

Assume 1/4″ seams

1. Join the green tops to each piece of orange fabric. Press the seams open.

2. Sew the mid-way point of the ribbon to the centre of the seam.

3. Keeping the ribbon out of the way, trim the sides at an angle, from the top corners to the centre of the bottom edge.  Do this to both outer pieces and the 2 lining pieces.

4. Place both outer pieces right sides together and sew down both sides (use a reverse stitch at the start and finish).

5. Carefully trim the bulk out of the point before turning right sides out and press.

6. Sew the 2 lining pieces right sides together (same as for the outer) leaving a 2″ gap in one side, near to the top. Do not turn right sides out.

7. Pop the outer cornet inside the lining so that right sides are together. Line up the side seams, pin and sew around the top edge.

8.  Pull the outer cornet through the gap in the lining.  Hand or machine stitch the gap closed.  Push the lining down inside the cornet, and press well around the top edge.

Stuff full of mini treats and tie closed with the ribbon!

Easter Carrot Cornets tutorial

Wouldn’t these be great fun to discover in the garden at an ‘Easter Egg Hunt’!

Wishing you lots of carrot fun!

And if you missed previous tutorials in my Easter series here are the links:

Easter Bunny Bags
Easter Bibs

Happy carrots!

Jude xo

Comments

0 Comments (Leave comment)

Patchwork Bibs!


By Judith on March 13, 2016
0 Comments (Leave comment)

Have you had a wonderful weekend?

The weather here has been positively balmy!!  15 degrees today (that was the average temperature last July)!

Following on from my Easter Bibs tutorial last week, I thought I’d show you some patchwork versions!

Baby Bibs Tutorial

 


These are great scrap buster projects, using 28 x 2.5″ squares (perfect for leftover jellyroll & binding strips).

Patchwork Bibs
Made with quilt leftovers – ‘Spring Walk’ by Little Cube

I used the same template as before, and quilted the patchwork front and towelling together, before sealing the raw edges with bias binding.

Patchwork Bibs
Made with leftover Bonnie and Camille jelly roll strips


These days there is a lovely selection of pretty bias and trims to choose from. Here’s a small selection I picked up locally.

Bias Binding
And if you don’t want to fuss with bias binding, quilt your patchwork front with a little wadding before following my original tutorial.
Baby Bibs Tutorial

These bibs took no time at all to make!  Wouldn’t they make gorgeous baby-shower gifts?
Patchwork Bibs

Whatever the occasion, I hope you are enjoying my Easter tutorials series.  More to come this week!
Linking up with Scraptastic Tuesday!
Jude xo

Comments

0 Comments (Leave comment)

Easter Bibs Tutorial


By Judith on March 10, 2016
0 Comments (Leave comment)

Welcome back to the second tutorial in my mini Easter series, and thank you to everyone for your lovely comments and responses to my Bunny Bags tutorial.

Today’s tutorial is for the youngest members of the chocolate fan club Family!

Baby Bibs Tutorial
Approx. 7.5″ by 11″ tall (buttoned)

These cute Easter bibs are so simple to make, using some cotton and towelling! In fact, 1 hand towel yields 5 bibs!

Baby Bibs Tutorial

 


Here’s what you need:

Materials:

Cotton (at least 8.5″ wide by 14″ tall per bib) good quality to withstand lots of washing!
1 white hand towel
1 set of snap fasteners

Method:  Assume 1/4″ seams

Download the bib template here.

1. Using the bib template, cut out 1 from the cotton and 1 from the towel.

2. Place right sides together and sew around all sides, leaving a 2″ gap in the bottom edge.

3. Carefully snip into all the curves at 1cm intervals. Turn bib right sides out through the gap. Press well and turn under the raw edges of the gap.

4. From the top side, sew around the bib 1/8″ from the edge closing the gap as you go.

5. Attach snap fasteners according to the manufacturers instructions. I found these KAM fasteners really easy to use (for similar snaps and pliers see here).

And you’re done!  Attach to baby (sorry, I don’t have one of those!) and feed!

And if you have a real dribble bucket teething baby on your hands, check out this tutorial for making cute dribble bandanas.

Baby Bibs Tutorial


Have fun!

(I’ll have more on my patchwork bibs tomorrow!)

Jude xo

Comments

0 Comments (Leave comment)

Bunny Bags (Part 2) Tutorial


By Judith on March 7, 2016
0 Comments (Leave comment)

Happy Monday everyone!

With less than 3 weeks until Easter Day, I think it’s time we got started on some fun tutorials, don’t you!

And to kick us off, how about some cute drawstring Bunny Bags!

Easter Bunny Bags tutorial

How cute are these!  The perfect size for filling with small chocolates and eggs!

Bunny Bags!

Approx. 4″ wide by 7″ tall (incl. ears!)

You will need:

Outer Bag: 2 x (6″ wide by 8″ tall)
Lining: 2 x (6″ wide by 8″ tall)
Ears front: 2 x (2.5″ wide by 4.5″ tall)
Ears back: 2 x (2.5″ wide by 4.5″ tall)
Lightweight iron-on vilene: 1 x (2.5″ x 9″)
0.5″ wide ribbon: 2 x 17″
small safety pin

Assume 1/4″ seams

Download ‘Ear’ template here.

1. Iron the vilene onto the wrong sides of 2 matching ear fabrics. Cut the 2 pieces apart. Using the ears template, draw an ‘ear’ onto the wrong sides of the other ear fabrics.

2. Place (different) ear fabrics right sides together and sew on pencil line (use a reverse stitch to start and finish). Trim away excess fabric, leaving 1/8″ seam allowance.

3. Turn the ears right sides out, press and turn under the open ends. Sew across the ends as close to the edges as you can.  Put to one side.

4. Place the outer fabrics right sides together.  Mark 2″ down from both top corners.

5. Sew around sides and bottom from marker to marker.  Repeat for the 2 lining pieces, but leave a 2″ gap in the bottom edge.

6. Pull the corners apart and place the side seam on top of the bottom seam. Measure 1″ along the seam from the point (this will give you 2″ vertically).  Mark the vertical line and sew along this line. Repeat for both corners on outer bag and lining.

7. Place the top ‘flaps’ right sides together, outer fabric with lining. Pin at the point where the side seams meet.

8. Sew around both ‘flaps’ between pins at both sides. Use a reverse stitch to start and finish, and take care not to sew into the existing seam.

9. Turn bag right side out through the gap in the lining. Hand or machine stitch the gap closed and press well.

10. Press the flaps under by approx. 0.5″ or until they reach the side seams. Pin and sew one flap down (as clos
e to the edge as possible).  Use a reverse stitch to start and finish.

11. Pin the ears onto the remaining (turned under) flap leaving approx. 1″ between the ears at the bottom. Sew along the edge of the flap and along the bottom of the ears. Use a reverse stitch to start and finish.

12. Attach the safety pin to one end of the ribbon and pass through both channels until it comes out the same side where you started.

13. Knot the ribbon ends together and repeat for the other piece of ribbon from the opposite side.

And you’re finished!
Fill up the bag with chocolate goodies and pull the drawstrings to close!
(I guarantee you it won’t stay closed for long!!)
Tune in again for more tutorials on everything you see here in my Easter basket!
Easter Tutorials on my blog

Happy Easter Sewing!
Jude xo

Comments

0 Comments (Leave comment)