Easy Baby Quilt Tutorial


By Judith on September 29, 2020
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I’m often asked for quick and easy baby quilt patterns!

 

Once baby has arrived it’s great to have a speedy ‘go to’ pattern to run up in either your favourite boyish fabrics or pretty girly prints for those special and meaningful gifts!

 

My Square in a Square Baby Quilt pattern will cover all bases, and it’s beginner friendly too!

 

 

This cot size quilt finishes at 40.5″ x 54″ and would also make a great play mat!

 

 

I’ve used lots of bright and colourful Amy Butler prints for the main fabric in my girly version, teamed with soft Kona Snow for the background and a fun stripey binding!

 

 

The rounded corners soften the look of the quilt and simple ‘echo’ quilting provides an effective but simple quilting design for starter quilters.

 

 

And even better, this is a charm square friendly quilt, so cutting is kept to a minimum!

You can get the free tutorial here.

Happy sewing!

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New Tutorial: Tilda Drawstring Bag


By Judith on July 2, 2020
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If you are a regular here, you may remember I made a few linen drawstring bags in my spare time, for friends who were working hard during the pandemic.

 

 

Well I’m happy to announce that I have filmed a free tutorial on how to make these cute bags, and it is now available to watch on YouTube.

 

 

In the tutorial you will learn:

  • How to piece the exterior bag
  • How to quilt with a quilting bar
  • How to needleturn applique the heart
  • How to insert channels and lining
  • How to insert drawstring ribbon

 

And not only that, we have made up Tilda Drawstring Bag kits, to make your life even easier!

 

Tilda Drawstring Bag

 

The kit includes everything you need to make the bag (except thread) and all the pieces are pre-cut for you so you can get straight to the fun sewing stage!

 

Tilda Drawstring Bag

 

The fabrics are Tilda (base, lining and channels) and Essex Yarn Dyed Linen (outside).  There are 20 different Tilda Fabrics for the base and 2 different Tilda fabrics for the applique hearts.

 

Tilda Drawstring Bag

 

We even pre-cut freezer paper hearts ready for your needleturn applique!

 

Tilda Drawstring Bag

 

Don’t you think the kits would make a sweet gift for a sewing buddy?

 

Tilda Drawstring Bag

 

Of course the channel has to be a cute Tilda (Tea Towel) Stripe and a linen ribbon drawstring compliments the rustic character of the bag.

 

Tilda Drawstring Bag

 

The kits are available to purchase here.

 

I love making these bags, especially using my favourite fabrics!  I hope you enjoy making them too!

 

Happy sewing!

 

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Free Tutorial: Hexie Basket


By Judith on May 12, 2020
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As mentioned in my previous post, I have more baskets to show you!  And these are from my latest free YouTube Tutorial!

 

Hexie Basket Tutorial

 

In this tutorial you will learn:

 

~The English Paper Piecing technique

~Quilting the exterior panel

 

Hexie Basket Tutorial

 

~How to make and attaching Piping

 

Hexie Basket Tutorial

 

~Basket construction, including inserting the base and lining

 

 

Hexie Basket Tutorial

 

 

~Bindng the top edge to finish

 

Hexie Basket Tutorial

 

And a bonus feature at the end of the tutorial will show you how to calculate the cutting measurements for any size basket you wish to make!

 

Hexie Basket tutorial

 

So if you fancy making these cute baskets, why not check out my free video tutorial here.

 

Happy sewing!

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Scrappy Table Topper Video Tutorial


By Judith on April 12, 2020
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As lockdown continues here, I’ve had lots more time to play with my favourite scraps!

 

I’ve been needing a little mat to place under the tray that sits on my oak table.  I also love the process of making ‘stacked coins’ from scrappy strips.

 

So put the two together and what do you get? My free Scrappy Table Topper Tutorial!

 

Scrappy Table Topper Vidoe Tutorial

 

The tutorial will take you through how to make the stacked coin columns – they can be any size you wish, maximising the size of scraps you have.

 

Scrappy Table Topper Vidoe Tutorial

 

You will also see how to quilt the topper using a quilting bar – that weird looking ‘allen key’ type bar that languishes in your accessories tray!  It’s a really handy little gadget, and will save you lots of marking out time!

 

Scrappy Table Topper Vidoe Tutorial

 

I also show you how to make and finish off the binding by ‘stitching in the ditch’ from the front side.

 

Scrappy Table Topper Vidoe Tutorial

 

This is a really quick little project, and you can make these pretty and functional mats any size you like!  I now have several of them dotted around my house, bringing me joy each time my eye catches some of my favourite fabrics.

 

Scrappy Table Topper Vidoe Tutorial

 

I hope you enjoy the tutorial.  We are getting better with each one that we make, and we have more planned!

 

Happy sewing!

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Scrappy Pouches Video Tutorial


By Judith on April 6, 2020
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Hello everyone!

 

I hope you are all keeping safe and well during these strange days.  With much more time available to us, I guess you are all making lots of headway with all your WIPs and UFOs!!!!! (wink, wink!)

 

With no classes to teach, I thought I’d have a go at teaching online!!  With essential tech support from my daughter, we spent 6 days filming, editing, cringing,  re-filming and editing some more to finally produce our first video tutorial!

 

It’s far from perfect and we still have lots to learn (not sure I’ll ever get used to seeing & hearing myself on video!), but we are really pleased overall and the initial feedback is positive.

 

So if you have lots of scraps you would like to turn into something practical and pretty, then our free tutorial might just be what you’re looking for!

 

scrappy pouches video tutorial
Click on the pic and you’ll be taken to the tutorial on my Youtube Channel

 

These scrappy pouches can be made to any size, so you can cater for the scraps you have.

 

The strips are sewn down onto a foundation layer (either sew-in interlining, baking paper or wadding) and no matter the size of the pouch (or textile you use) the technique is the same.

 

I’ve made a cutesy pencil case size pouch ….

 

Scrappy Pouches Video Tutorial

 

…. as well as medium sized project or toiletry pouches.

 

Scrappy Pouches Video Tutorial
Scrappy Pouches Video Tutorial

 

And then I went large with my denim scraps, making this extra-large pouch, perfect for a laptop, files or even a knitting project!!

 

Scrappy Pouches Video Tutorial

 

The tutorial takes you step by step through making the strippy panels, creating zipper tabs, inserting the zipper and assembling and finishing the pouch.

 

Scrappy Pouches Video Tutorial

 

And you also get the measurements for all the sizes shown here.

 

So with all this time on our hands, there’s really no excuse for not diminishing those scraps!

 

Have fun and keep sewing!

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Plaited Wreath Tutorial


By Judith on November 22, 2019
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A big thank you to everyone for entering my ‘Katha on Tweed’ giveaway last week.

 

I announced the winner on Monday via Instagram, and was pleased to deliver the prize to local winner Jaele @a_million_paper_stars!

 

But don’t worry if you missed out this time.  I’ll be doing another giveaway at the end of the year to celebrate my 9 year blogiversary!  Stay tuned!

**********************************************************

 

So what have we been up to this week in class?  Well, as our class project this term has been the Folded Double Wreath, I thought I would do a quick demo on another type of wreath – the simple plaited wreath!

 

plaited wreath tutorial

 

This wreath uses much less fabric and is quicker to make! Win, win!

 

To make this wreath you will need:

3 x 3″ strips cut width of fabric

1 x 5″ strip cut width of fabric (bow)

Toy stuffing

Large Safety Pin

Wooden skewer or knitting needle

Co-ordinating thread

 

Method:  Use 1/4″ seam allowance

1  Fold each 3″ strip in half lengthways, right sides together, and sew down the long side.  Leave the short ends open.

 

 

2  Use a large safety pin to turn the tubes right sides out. Do not press.

 

 

3  Stuff the tubes from each open end towards the middle.  I used a wooden skewer for this. Make sure the tubes aren’t so well stuffed that they can’t be plaited.

 

4  At one end of each tube, tuck under the raw edges and pin and sew together across the top (I hand sewed a whip stitch here). Make sure the seams are all facing the back of the tubes.

 

 

5  Plait the wreath tightly ensuring no gaps between the tubes.

 

 

6  When you get to the end, trim the tubes to the same length, tuck under the raw edges and whip stitch them together as with the other end.

 

7  Neatly join both ends of the wreath, trying to continue the plaiting order.

 

8  To make the bow, fold the strip in half lengthways, right sides together, and sew down the long side, leaving a 3″ gap half way down.

 

 

9  Angle the ends of the bow by drawing a diagonal line a few inches in from one corner and down to the adjacent corner. Sew along this line.  Cut away the excess leaving 1/4″ seam allowance. Make sure the angled ends of the bow are pointing in opposite directions.

 

 

10  Turn the bow right sides out, push the points out with the skewer or knitting needle and press, making sure to tuck in the raw edges of the gap.

 

11  Stitch the gap closed and tie the bow to the wreath, covering the join.

 

Tip:  Tying the perfect bow – after the first tie, turn the wreath upside down and complete the bow.  The pointed ends of the bow will hang down towards the bottom of the wreath!

Magic!

 

 

And you’re done!

 

Plaited Christmas Wreath

 

A pretty wreath ready to hang up or gift!

 

Happy plaiting!

 

 

 

 

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Syringe Driver Bag Appeal 2


By Judith on July 11, 2019
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Almost 2 years ago I launched our first appeal for Syringe Driver Bags for Macmillan Cancer Care in Antrim Hospital.

 

Macmillan staff ‘modelling’ the bags!

 

As the name suggests, the bags carry Syringe Drivers, the vehicle for administering pain or sickness medication.  The patient receives the meds via a tube, which means they have to carry the Syringe Drivers around with them all the time.  Sometimes they have one syringe driver, sometimes 2.

 

Providing bright and colourful bags instead of the standard issue grey ones is a small way of bringing a little cheeriness to the patient, especially when they get to choose one they like!

 

 

For our first appeal we had a brilliant response from generous sewists across Northern Ireland.  So much so, we were able to pass on some bags to other palliative care units.

 

These bags can’t be reused, and the supply of bags from the first appeal has been exhausted.

 

Macmillan have asked us for more, so we are launching our 2nd Syringe Driver Bag Appeal!

 

 

If you have some sewing machine experience and cotton fabric, would you consider making one or two bags for those receiving palliative care or cancer treatment?  You can find the tutorial here.

 

Previously we have only made for adult males and females, but now we also have a request from The Children’s Hospice, N.I., so we can receive bags in child-friendly fabrics too!

 

I launched the 2nd appeal on Facebook 10 days ago and we’ve already received 25 bags!  THANK YOU!

 

I’ve always known how generous our sewing community is! Please, please help us to make many more bags!  The bags can be posted or delivered to me at home.  Email me at justjudedesigns@hotmail.co.uk for my address.

 

And if you live locally to Belfast, keep your eyes and ears open for an announcement about a free Syringe Driver Bag Workshop at our studio in Conway Mill!

 

Thank you!

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Log Cabin Family of Blocks: Part 2


By Judith on May 21, 2019
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Welcome back to my Log Cabin Blocks series (part 1 available here).

Log Cabin Family of Blocks

 

In part 1 we looked at a range of Log Cabin blocks, from Traditional to Wonky!

 

In part 2, we are going to look at the 2nd category in this family of blocks.

(All sample blocks are made using fabrics from ‘Handmade’ by Makower)

 

Part 2: Courthouse Steps

 

Courthouse Steps Variations

 

1.  Traditional:

Similar to the traditional Log Cabin Block, ‘steps’ are added in rounds to the centre square, this time attaching to two opposite edges first before adding steps to the remaining 2 edges.  The ‘steps’ are the same width.

 

Courthouse Steps Construction

 

Here is one of my traditional Courthouse Steps Quilts, this time starting with a background square (I’ve marked the block to make it easier for you to identify).

 

 

‘Garden Steps’ featured in British Patchwork & Quilting Magazine

 

I love how the secondary pattern from the Courthouse Steps blocks dominates in this design!

You can find a traditional Courthouse Steps block tutorial here.

 

2. Colour Rounds:

As with the Log Cabin Colour Rounds variation, the same fabric is used in each round, but sticking with the same traditional Courthouse Steps construction.

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

3. Cornerstones:

By adding squares (cornerstones) to the ends of the ‘steps’ you will add an Irish Chain secondary pattern to your quilt.

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

Photo source: http://serial-quilter.blogspot.com

 

4. Rectangle

You can change the starting shape of a Courthouse Steps Block to any 4 sided shape (like Log Cabin) but not a triangle.

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

As I mentioned in my last post, there are lots more great Courthouse steps variations available.  Like this ‘sliced’ Courthouse Steps:

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

In this version, you make two blocks in two fabrics, one positive, one negative.

 

Slice them in half diagonally, switch them over and sew back together!

 

Courthouse Steps Blocks

 

Now the point of doing this lies in the secondary patterns you can achieve from Sliced Courthouse Steps.

 

Photo source https://mypatchwork.wordpress.com

 

Aren’t they cool!

A video tutorial of Sliced Courthouse Steps is available here.

 

You can find more inspiring Courthouse Steps examples on my Pinterest board here.

 

And I’ll leave you with a picture of a Courthouse Steps block I’m currently working on, using vintage sheets.

 

 

I hope you’ll come back soon for part 3 of our Log Cabin Family series.

 

Happy sewing!

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Triple Porthole Tutorial


By Judith on January 31, 2019
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Hi there, the ‘5 minute demo’ in my classes for this month was all about Portholes!

 

Porthole Dumpling Pouch

 

I first learned how to do this nifty technique from Lu Summers at the 2012 Fat Quarterly Retreat.

 

Porthole Water Bottle Covers

 

It was so much fun, and one of those techniques that is deceptively easy!

 

Porthole Journal Covers/Quilt Now Nov15

 

You can pretty much porthole any shape, and show off some patchwork, feature fabric or pretty vintage embroidery. But my advice is not to get too intricate with the shape otherwise the outline may not keep its definition.

 

Spring Rain Quilt

 

At the Retreat I was sitting beside this talented lady, and inspired by her triple porthole cushions, I’ve made my own 18″ version and written up the tutorial for you here.

 

Triple Porthole Tutorial

 

You Will need:

Fabric 1 (centre): 7″ square

Fabric 2: 12.5″ square

Fabric 3: 16.5″ square

Fabric 4: 18.5″ square

5.5″ diameter bowl or plate to draw around (alternatively use template plastic and compass)

9″ diameter bowl or plate to draw around

13″ diameter bowl or plate to draw around

Calico: Same 3 cuts as Fabrics 2-4 above

 

Method:

Use 1/4″ seam allowance

 

1  Press the 12.5″ calico square in half both ways to find the centre.

 

 

2  Centre the 5.5″ diameter bowl (or template plastic) onto the calico and draw round the circle.

 

 

3  Place the calico onto the RIGHT side of Fabric 2, with the circle facing up.  Pin the layers together and stitch on the circle.

 

 

4  Carefully cut away the fabric in the middle of the circle leaving an 1/8″ seam allowance.

 

 

5  Push the calico through the hole and round to the back. Press well so there is no calico showing from the front side.

 

 

6  Position and centre Fabric 1 (feature fabric) behind the calico, before pinning and sewing around the hole, 1/8″ from the edge.

 

 

7  Peel back the top fabric from the calico and feature fabric laying behind.  Carefully trim away all the excess calico and feature fabric leaving 1/8″ seam allowance.  Do not cut through Fabric 2!  Put to one side.

 

 

8  Repeat steps 1-5 for the 16.5″ piece of calico and 9″ diameter bowl/plate.

 

 

9  Pin the first porthole (with feature fabric) behind this porthole.  Sew around the 2nd porthole 1/8″ from the edge, as before.

 

 

10 Peel back the top fabric from the calico and feature fabric laying behind.  Carefully trim away all the excess calico and feature fabric leaving 1/8″ seam allowance.  Do not cut through Fabric 3!  Put to one side.

 

 

11 Repeat steps 8-10 for Fabric 4 and 13″ diameter bowl/plate.

 

 

Tip:   If you want to turn your piece into a cushion, I recommend not trimming away the last layer of calico and excess feature fabric.  This will add more stability to the outer edges.

 

Now you have your triple porthole piece, you can turn it into a pretty cushion!

 

Triple Porthole Cushion

 

I spray basted wadding and calico behind the cushion front, hand ‘echo’ quilted the portholes, before adding some mini pompoms and an envelope back!

 

Triple Porthole Cushion

 

I hope you enjoyed my tutorial and have lots of fun giving portholes a go!

 

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New Year Table Display: Part1


By Judith on January 14, 2019
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We are well into our stride again with the new term of classes.

So it’s time to show you my New Year Display Table!

 

New Year 19 Display Table

 

I’ve gone for a ‘kitchen’ theme this term, getting you inspired to pretty up your table and domestic space, as well as lots of gift ideas for those friends who love being in their kitchen!

 

So let’s get started!

 

1  Trivet Mats

 

EPP Trivet Mats

 

Over the years I have gathered up lots of free EPP (English Paper Piecing) packs and templates, most of which came free with quilting magazines.

 

EPP

 

Often there is a useful little book or pattern ideas that come with them, and I spent my free time over Christmas doing some relaxing hand sewing, and having fun with my Tilda scraps.

 

Trivet Mats

 

I used some Essex Yarn Dyed linen (Flax and Denim) for the backgrounds, appliqued and quilted them onto Polyester Insulating Wadding (available here) and made my own bias binding to finish.

 

Trivet Mats

 

I purposely used the thicker poly wadding (also used in oven gloves) to give my mats some durability when being used as trivets.  I also love the lush texture you get from the denser batting.

 

Trivet Mats

 

You could easily replace this wadding with Insul Bright heat resistant wadding and turn them into placemats (all materials mentioned are machine washable).

 

2  Aprons

 

I have 2 types of Aprons on display, and I will be teaching them both as a Saturday workshop on 9th March.

 

Apron workshop

 

The popular Cross Back apron is available here.

The pattern for my Tie Back apron will be coming soon (adult and child sizes will be available).

 

apron in a jar 005

 

This apron is designed to fit into a decorative mason jar so it can be gifted!

Cute or what!

 

3  Lunchbags (2 styles)

 

 (Pattern coming soon)

 

Lunchbags

 

I had a lot of fun designing these lunchbags several years ago for Popular Patchwork magazine.

 

Lunchbags

 

The raw edge applique designs can be child or adult friendly (or you could even made a patchwork version – that’s next on my list!).

 

Lunchbags

 

Both bags are insulated with Insul Bright heat resistant wadding, and the linings are made from wipeable Rip-stop nylon (or you could re-purpose a machine washable shower curtain!).

 

Lunchbags

 

The pattern (includes both styles) is currently being tested and will be available soon.

 

4  Teabag Wallet

 

(free tutorial available here)

 

Teabag wallet

 

I’m not a tea drinker, but I have family and friends who not only love their tea, but like something a little more ‘individual’.

 

Teabag Wallet Tutorial

 

These portable (and uber cute!) little wallets will hold 4 individually wrapped teabags, in all your favourite flavours.

 

Teabag Wallet Tutorial

 

They are ridiculously easy to make (all the pieces are cut the same size!) and would make great little gifts for tea lovers everywhere!

 

5  Oven Gloves

(free tutorial available here)

 

Oven Gloves

 

For a long time now, I’ve badly needed to replace my tatty old oven gloves.

Like my trivet mats, I have used Polyester Insulating wadding in these oven gloves (also known as ‘oven glove wadding’!!).

 

Oven Gloves

 

The quilting and assembly of the gloves is straightforward, and I used pre-made bias binding to finish.

 

Oven Gloves

 

Only problem is, with the way that I cook, these are just waaaaaay too nice to risk the kind of food mess that I’m particularly good at!!

 

6  Tea Cosy

(pattern available here)

 

Folksy Tea Cosy Workshop

 

I’ll be running my Folksy Tea cosy pattern as a Saturday workshop in April.

 

I originally designed this for Sewing World magazine, and it combines insulating wadding and fun felt applique.

 

Folksy Tea Cosy

 

The pattern takes you through how to measure your teapot and calculate your bespoke teacosy measurements.  It also includes the additional applique design ‘Sit Long Talk Much’.

 

Tea cosy class sample

 

7  Bottle Carrier

 

(free tutorial available here)

 

 

Bottle Holder

 

If you like to take a bottle of wine round to a friend’s house, or to your favourite ‘BYO’ restaurant, then you might find this reusable bottle carrier a handy addition to your kitchen cupboard.

 

Bottle Holder

 

One fat quarter will make the whole carrier, but why not jazz it up with a contrast fabric!

**************************************************

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed part 1 of my New Year Display Table roundup.

Do come back again for more kitchenalia tutorials and patterns in part 2.

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Teabag Wallet Tutorial


By Judith on January 7, 2019
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Teabag Wallet Tutorial

 

If you’re not a standard tea drinker, how about keeping a few of your favourite flavours in a portable and handy wallet!

 

Teabag Wallet Tutorial

 

This simple tutorial will have you ‘bagged’ up in no time!

(And a great little gift idea for a tea loving friend don’t you think!)

 

You will need:

Exterior: 1 x (5″ x 7″)

Lining: 1 x (5″ x 7″)

Pockets: 2 x (5″ x 7″)

Heavy Sew-in Vilene: 1 x (5″ x 7″)

505 Basting Spray

chalk pen or non-permanent fabric marker

elastic hair bobble

button

 

Method:

 

1 Spray baste the vilene to the wrong side of the lining.

 

 

2 Bring both long edges of each pockets wrong sides together and press.

 

 

3 Place the first pocket onto the right side of the lining, with the folded edge of the pocket positioned 1.5″ down from the top of the lining.

 

 

4 Sew along the bottom of the pocket 1/8″ from the raw edge and through all layers.

 

 

5 Place the last pocket on top, this time with the raw edge aligned with the bottom of the lining. Chalk a line through the centre as shown.

 

 

6 Sew along the chalk line, through all layers.

 

 

7 Machine tack a hair bobble just above the front pocket, on the right side. The loop of the elastic must face in towards the wallet.

 

 

8 Pin the exterior right sides together with the pocket section. Sew around all sides using 1/4″ seam allowance, leaving a 2″ gap along the bottom edge.

 

 

9 Turn the wallet right sides out through the gap in the lining. Press under the raw edges of the gap.

 

 

10 Sew around all sides of the wallet using 1/8″ seam allowance, closing the gap as you go.

 

 

11 Press the wallet in half and sew a button onto the front and aligned with the elastic.

 

 

Fill up with your favourite teas and off you go!

 

Teabag Wallet Tutorial

 

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2018 Roundup & Happy New Year!


By Judith on December 31, 2018
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It’s the final few hours of 2018.  At the end of each year I like to do a little round-up of things I’ve made.

Understandably, the majority of my makes have centred around my classes.

The statistics are quite something (ah, so that’s why I’m so tired, wink, wink!!):

 

5 Class Projects:

(taught at 6 weekly classes, over 38 weeks)

2018 class projects

 

12 Saturday Workshops:

 

2018 Saturday workshops

 

11 Free Tutorials:

(available here)

2018 Tutorials

 

23 New Pattern Releases:

(available here)

2018 New Patterns

 

What an amazing year it has been, both inside the classroom and outside it!

 

Patchwork in the Peaks 14

 

One of my professional highlights in 2018 was attending Patchwork in the Peaks Quilters Retreat, Morzine, France, as guest tutor.

 

And on a personal level, hosting a memory quilt party for my special friend’s 50th birthday in February was a wonderful day!

 

Shirleys Friendship Birthday Quilt

 

Helping 2 charities, Shared Threads and Flourish, launch their new sewing initiatives, both aimed at improving the lives of women, locally and internationally was (and continues to be) a pleasure and a privilege.

 

Shared Threads
Shared Threads Drawstring Bags

 

Among the many highs and lows that come in a year, I’m reminded of my ‘word for the year’ back in January ’18 – RHYTHM.

 

I set a word at the start of each year to give me a focus to my professional and life goals.

 

After a massive year of change in 2017, I feel I definitely achieved some rhythm, allowing life to settle some, and to get into my stride with the new classroom and home.

 

Of course there were still changes in 2018, some happy, some sad, some expected, some unexecpted; the normalcy of life demands it.

 

But amidst it all, I have much to be thankful for and am content to leave 2018 with a smile, and embrace the exciting new chapter that is 2019.

 

Come back soon to find out all about my word for 2019!

 

In the meantime ……

 

Happy New Year!

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Christmas Baubles Roundup


By Judith on November 20, 2018
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Last week in classes I gave a little run down on all the Christmas ornaments hanging on my decorative tree!

 

Christmas Baubles

 

Most of them are free tutorials I’ve either found on Pinterest or written myself.

 

I thought you might like to take part in our little Christmas Baubles club too!  So here are all the links!

 

Zippy Baubles Pouches

(great for gifting money or vouchers)

Free tutorial available here – simply adapt the ‘egg’ shape into a circle

 

Bauble Zippy pouches

 

Stitchy Trees

Free tutorial available here

 

Stitchy Christmas Trees

 

Christmas Cornets

Free tutorial here – switch the Easter fabrics for Christmas fabrics & add a bell!

 

Christmas Baubles

 

Mini Hoops

No tutorial but lots of free inspiration and ideas on Pinterest (search for Christmas mini hoops)

 

Christmas Baubles

 

‘Oh My Eye’ Birds

(2 sizes)

Pattern available here

 

Christmas Baubles

Christmas Baubles

 

Star Pentagon Decoration

Free pattern available here

 

Christmas Baubles

 

Faux Cathedral Windows Decoration

Free pattern available here

 

Christmas Baubles

 

 

So that’s my Christmas baubles roundup (my  little tree is completely full!).

I hope you enjoy making sweet gifts and decorations this year!

 

Happy sewing!

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Stitchy Christmas Tree Tutorial


By Judith on November 14, 2018
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It’s all about the festive makes at the moment at Just Jude Designs!

 

So I thought I’d bring you a fun and easy little Christmas tutorial to get you in the festive spirit!

 

Stitchy Tree Tutorial

 

For 1 Tree You will need:

2 x (5″ wide x 6″ tall) pieces of background fabric

2 x (5″ wide x 6″ tall) pieces of heavy weight sew-in vilene

2 x (4.5″ wide x 5.5″ tall) thin card

Green, red and gold/yellow threads

Thread to match background fabric

1″ x 2″ wide ribbon (trunk)

4″ length of narrow ribbon

Hand sewing needle

Non-permanent fabric marker

 

Method:

1 Cut the card into an isosceles triangle – draw a line from each bottom corner to the middle of the top edge. Cut away the sides.

 

 

2 Place the vilene behind the background fabric (I use a little basting spray here).  On the vilene, I centred and drew around the card triangle as a guideline for stitching.

 

 

3 From the right side, draw 1″ lines across the background fabric using a non-permanent fabric pen.

 

 

4 Select a decorative stitch on your machine and sew along one of the lines.

 

5 Continue sewing decorative stitches along all the lines (for the lines near the top of the tree you only need to sew 0.5″ wider than the triangle marking).

 

 

6 Now sew decorative stitches in lines between the ones already sewn. Repeat steps 2-6 for the other background piece.

 

7 Cut out a generous 1/4″ wider than the triangle.

 

 

8 Pin the triangle card to the wrong side of one of the pieces. Using the English Paper Piecing (EPP) method, wrap the edges around the card and hand tack in place.

 

 

9 From the right side, machine stitch around the edges 1/8″ from the edge. At the bottom edge of the tree, catch the folded ‘trunk’ ribbon as you sew past. Remove the tacking stitches & leave in the card.

 

 

10 Hand tack a ribbon loop to the top of the tree (inside edge).

 

 

11 EPP & top stitch the remaining card triangle to the other stitched piece in the same way as before. Remove the tacking stitches & leave in the card.

 

12 Bring the 2 trees wrong sides together and whip stitch (by hand) the 2 trees together.

 

 

Hang up and admire!

 

 

Happy stitching!

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Christmas Table Display: Part 2


By Judith on October 31, 2018
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Welcome back to part 2 of my Christmas Table Display! (part 1 available here)

 

Christmas Table Display 18

 

I’ve had great reactions to my Christmas display in my classes this week.

I hope you enjoy reading about them too!

 

6 Festive Stars Table Runner

(pattern available here)

 

Christmas Table Runner Class sample

 

This is one of my newest patterns available for general release!

 

It is a ‘charm pack friendly’ project, but the pattern also includes yardage quantities to make the runner  in 3 feature fabrics.

 

I’ve seen my runner made in non-Christmas fabrics (I love seeing different interpretations of the same pattern!), and I have this variation done in Retro 30’s prints hanging up in class.

 

Economy Stars Table Runner

 

7 Christmas Gift Bags

(free tutorial available here)

 

Christmas gift bags tutorial

 

This is another ‘Eco Friendly’ way to ‘gift wrap’ a smaller present. Waaaaay nicer than paper which gets torn up and thrown away!

 

I’ve made so many of these easy peasy bags, housing sweet jams or chutneys, sumptuous bubble baths and creams or decadent chocolates and liqueurs!

 

Drawstring Gift Bag

 

So if you want to ‘upgrade’ a small gift into a ‘wow’ gift, give my drawstring gift bags a try!

 

8 Zippered Bauble Pouches

(free tutorial available here)

 

Bauble Zippy pouches

 

The link above is to the Easter Egg version of these pouches, but simply draw a circle instead of an egg and follow the same tutorial.

 

If you know someone who prefers money or gift vouchers (or diamonds!) pop them into this compact pouch.  The addition of a key-fob attachment turns it into a useful little coin purse!

 

Christmas Bauble pouch

 

Then hang them on the tree, or stuff into stockings and wait for the smiles!

 

9 Christmas Coasters

(no pattern available)

 

Christmas coasters

 

These 5″ Christmas themed coasters are made using the foundation paper piecing method and are great for using up small Christmas scraps!

 

Christmas coasters

 

I first saw them here, but the link to the maker’s website is no longer available.

 

However, if you are attending my classes, I can easily take you through the making of these!

 

10 Christmas Cracker Tree Skirt

(pattern available here)

 

Christmas Cracker Tree Skirt (class project)

 

This fun tree skirt forms part of our class project this term.

 

The pattern is by my talented quilty friend, Reene, and you can read more about this project here.

 

Well I hope my Christmas table display and projects has fueled your Christmas inspiration and motivation!

 

With less than 8 weeks to go til the big day, I guess we’d better get our sewing machine ‘skates’ on!

 

Happy sewing!

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Infinity Scarf Tutorial


By Judith on September 28, 2018
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My 5 minute demo in class this month was how to make these super easy infinity scarfs.

 

DSC_0020

 

You can use anything between 1 and 4 pieces of fabric for your scarf.

 

Infinity Scarfs

 

The sumptuous softness of Art Gallery fabrics  or Liberty Lawns work particularly well, but you can also use quilting cotton, or for a more cosy scarf, try brushed cotton or snuggly fleece.

 

Would you like to know how to make them? My tutorial shows you how to make a scarf from 4 fabrics.

 

Infinity scarf tutorial

 

You will need:

Scarf made from 1 fabric: 1 x (20″ x 60″) or

Scarf made from 2 fabrics: 2 x (10.5″ x 60″) or

Scarf made from 3 fabrics: 2 x (10.5″ x 30″) & 1 x (10.5″ x 60″) or

Scarf made from 4 fabrics: 4 x (10.5″ x 30″)

3 metres mini pom pom trim (optional)

Adjustable zipper foot

 

Use 1/4″ seam allowance

 

1  Sew 2 panels right sides together  along the short edges. Press the seam open.  Repeat for the other 2 panels.

 

 

2 On the right side of one of the pairs, pin and machine tack 2 x 60″ lengths of mini pom pom trim down both long sides. The pom poms should be facing away from the outer edges.  I used my zipper foot for this part so I could sew past the pom poms.

 

 

3 Place both paired panels right sides together and sew down both long sides.  Again, I used my zipper foot here.

 

 

4 Turn the scarf right side out.

 

5  Iron under the raw edges of one short end by 1/4″.

 

 

6  Take the other short end and twist the scarf once before tucking it into the ironed under short end.

 

 

7 Even out the short ends, pin and sew them together, 1/8″ from the folded edge. You are only sewing through the 2 short ends here.

 

 

And there you have it!  A beautifully soft infinity scarf.

 

Infinity Scarfs

 

You can of course lengthen and widen the measurements here to suit your needs or style!

 

Have fun making these versatile and practical scarves. But be warned!

 

EVERYONE will want one!!!

 

Happy sewing!

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Autumn Table Projects Part 2


By Judith on September 12, 2018
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Hello there!

 

As promised, I’m back to tell you about the rest of the projects on my Autumn Table!

 

Autumn18 Table Display

 

(you can read all about projects 1-5 here)

 

6. Denim Washbag:

 

Denim Washbag

 

My love of repurposing denim gets everywhere!

 

Unfortunately I don’t have a pattern written up yet for this project, but I’m currently working on a new Denim Pouch Bag, so stay tuned for new ways to upcycle your denim.

 

7. Stacked Coins Cushion

(pattern available here)

 

Scrappy Stacked Coins Cushion

 

I had so much fun making this cushion for my Scrap Busting Saturday last month.

 

Scrappy Stacked Coins Cushion

 

I have soooooooo many scraps I was able to ‘stack my coins’ into 10 colourways, 5 in the front and 5 in the back!

 

Scrappy Stacked Coins Cushion

 

The pattern includes a nifty step by step guide on how to put a zipper into your cushion.

 

Scrappy Stacked Coins cushion

 

And don’t worry if you don’t have as many ‘organised’ scraps as me, you can go completely random and throw everything (and the kitchen sink!) in!

 

8. Zippy pouches

(Easy Peasy Pouch pattern available here)

 

Easy Peasy Zippered Pouch Workshop

 

(Gracie Pouch pattern available here)

 

The Gracie Pouch Workshop

 

Another successful workshop last month was my Zippy Pouches day!

 

This was all about conquering the ‘fear of the zipper’, and adding more fabulous gift making ideas to the repertoire!

 

Easy Peasy Zippered Pouch Workshop

 

The Easy Peasy Pouch is a great beginner friendly pattern on which to cut your zippy teeth on (2 sizes available)!

 

The Gracie Pouch Workshop

 

And if you’re feeling a little more adventurous, try the roomy Gracie Pouch (also available in 2 sizes).

 

9. Tissue Box Covers

(free tutorial available here)

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

Aren’t these much better looking than cardboard tissue boxes!

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

And the great thing about this tutorial is you can cover any size box, with my handy ‘made to measure’ table!

 

10. Hot Water Bottle Cover

(pattern available here)

 

Hot Water Bottle Cover Pattern

 

As temperatures are cooling, how cosy would it be to snuggle up in the evening with a soothing hot water bottle and a great read.

 

Hot Water Bottle Cover Pattern

 

This cover fits a standard size hot water bottle, and if you line it with Insul Bright heat resistant wadding, your bottle stays warmer for longer!

 

And a great gift idea, don’t you think!

 

So there we have it!  My Autumn Table Roundup full of ideas and inspiration this new season.

 

Thank you for tuning in!

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Tissue Box Cover Tutorial


By Judith on August 20, 2018
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It’s about time I posted another tutorial here, don’t you think?

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

Before all the sniffles and colds get going, how about pretty, quilted tissue box covers.  I’d much rather see pretty fabric sitting in my room, than a functional cardboard box!

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

And this tutorial will explain how to cover a box of any size, so let’s get started!

 

You Will Need:

 

Exterior Fabric

Lining Fabric

Wadding

Heavy Sew-In Vilene

Non-permanent fabric marker

Cardboard or template plastic

 

Measure your box:

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

Take measurements A (short side), B (long side) and C (top).  Then add 3/4″ (0.75″) to each measurement (1/2″ for seam allowances, 1/4″ for ease) to get the cutting out sizes.

 

You can see my measurements in the example below:

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

Cutting Out:

 

So now that you have the cutting out measurements you can either ….

 

apply all measurements to your exterior fabrics, lining fabric, wadding and heavy sew-in vilene

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial

 

OR

 

instead of cutting out the sides, cut and baste an 11″ x 12″ piece of exterior fabric, wadding and sew-in vilene.  Once quilted, this is big enough to cut out all 4 sides.

 

 

You will also need this template for the openings.  I use the larger shape for rectangular boxes and the smaller shape for cube boxes.  Cut out the openings and transfer them to card or template plastic.

 

Make It:

 

Use 1/4″ seams

 

1  If you haven’t already done so, spray baste the exterior fabrics, wadding and vilene together.

 

2 Quilt as desired (I marked and quilted a 1.5″ diagonal grid, see photo above).

 

 

3 Pin an exterior short side (A) right sides together with the exterior top (C). With a pen, mark 1/4″ in from each corner on the short side (wrong side).

 

 

4 Sew from marker to marker, starting and finishing with a reverse stitch. Repeat for the other short side.

 

 

5 Press the short ends out before attaching the long sides in the same way (remember to mark your 1/4″ points).

 

 

6 Repeat steps 3-5 for the lining pieces.

 

 

7 Find the middle of the lining top piece (I simply folded it in half lengthways and widthways and finger pressed).

 

 

8 Centre your chosen template opening onto the wrong side of the lining top piece and draw around it.

 

 

9 Pin the exterior and lining pieces right sides together. Sew along the drawn line, starting and finishing with a reverse stitch.

 

 

10 Carefully cut out the opening, leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance. Snip at 1cm intervals all the way around the opening, taking care not to cut into the stitches.

 

 

11 Push the lining through the opening and all the way round to the back of the exterior. Iron around the opening to neaten.

 

 

12 Top stitch around the opening, 1/8″ from the edge.

 

 

13 Pin the exterior sides right sides together. Sew adjacent exterior sides together, sewing from the top down to the 1/4″ marker (fold the top piece out of the way so you can get right down to the 1/4″ marker). Start and finish with a reverse stitch.

 

Tissue Box Cover Tutorial